September | 2019 | Red Robot

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DC Shines The Bat-Signal Across The World In Honor Of Batman Day!

To celebrate the Dark Knight’s 80 years as the World’s Greatest Detective, DC and Warner Bros. lit up the night skies by projecting the iconic Bat-Signal, and produced fan celebrations, in major cities around the globe.

Batman Day takes flight worldwide as millions of fans of all ages gather on six continents in celebration of the Dark Knight. Today’s global Bat-Signal projections mark the 80th anniversary of the Caped Crusader’s first appearance in the pages of DC Comics back in 1939. 

Beginning in Melbourne and concluding in Los Angeles, this auspicious confluence of fan celebrations spotlight the character that now ranks as the most widely recognized masked man in pop culture.

Bat-Signal activations, Batman 5K night runs, talent signings and fan celebrations are highlighting DC’s annual Batman Day festivities, where the character and his stories are feted globally on a single day.

Location details include:

– Melbourne at Fed Square

– Tokyo at MAGNET by SHIBUYA109 at Shibuya Scramble Crossing

– Johannesburg at The Leonardo Building

– Berlin at Potzdamer Platz 11

– Rome at Roma Termini

– Paris at Galeries Lafayette

– Barcelona at Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya

– London at the Senate House

– São Paulo at Itaúsa – LMB

– Montreal at Complex Dupuis

– New York at the Domino Sugar Refinery

– Mexico City at Torre Reforma

– Los Angeles at the Warner Bros. Studio Lot

– To honor 80 years of The Dark Knight, the spire of New York’s Empire State Building was lit in Batman Yellow.

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World’s Leading Nature Photographers Speak Out For Climate Action

World’s leading nature photographers speak out for climate action at the International Photography Festival in Sharjah

Sharjah, UAE – XPOSURE’s International Photography Festival has opened its biggest ever edition with 357 world’s top and emerging photographers in Sharjah, UAE.

With events such as workshops taking photographers for a shoot in the desert scenery, a packed programme of talks, workshops and award-wining photography on display, the planet’s future is the big theme.

As the world leaders gather for what is seen as possibly the most consequential week for climate change action in New York next week, some of the world’s most renowned names in photography are lending their imagery and voices to the conversation.

Documenting melting glaciers, disappearing species and habitats, human-animal conflict and human displacement, they hope their work will make the public feel the pull to protect them.

Florian Ledoux is a wildlife photographer who has sailed over 6000 miles from the coast of Greenland to document the Arctic wildlife.

His aerial images document the rapid decline in ice, revealing polar animals and their habitats in ways not seen before.

What drives him is his desire to reconnect people to nature, he senses that this has been lost for many and he believes that connection is one that is critical for real action on climate.

“If we are not connected to nature we won’t change the way we are living”, Ledoux said. “If you are part of something you don’t want to destroy it.”

One of his most iconic images shows a polar bear crossing two chunks of ice.

The beautiful patches of turquoise surrounding it are sections of melting ice and offer a painful evidence of fragility of Arctic glaciers.

“Ice in the Arctic are already fragile in a way that it can be gone in just just one moment like that. It’s melting so quickly. This is the fragility of our world because when we lose this, we will change so many things in the climate.”

In a heatwave reaching Greenland this summer, nearly 60% of the ice sheet had at least 1mm melted on the surface in just one day on the 31st of July, according to National Snow and Ice Data Centre in Colorado and the Polar Portal.

The amount of ice lost on two record consecutive days during the heatwave would be sufficient to cover Florida with almost five inches of water or Denmark with half a meter, according to climate scientist Martin Stendel.

“We need change right now. There is no time to wait or to say that we have time or we can do it later, it has to be now”, said Ledoux.

Frans Lanting, hailed as one of the great nature photographers of our time and a environmental economist by background, has documented ecological hot spots from India to New Zealand in breath-taking imagery for over 40 years.

Taking us visually to the Antarctic, he speaks of connections between melting ice and wildlife. “Emperor penguins are totally dependent on sea ice. That’s what they gather to reproduce themselves. They never touch solid ground and as the ice disappears so will emperor penguins.”

But the biggest message is that all habitats are interconnected. “Ultimately climate change is not just about the lives of emperor penguins and polar bears. It is about us. It’s going to affect everyone on the planet no matter where you live”, Lanting said.

In his signature series “Day to Night”, one of America’s most iconic photographers Stephen Wilkes, digitally blends thousands of images shot over a 36-hour period into one photograph, capturing the life in that habitat.

“It is about creating a visceral experience for you, the viewer. I want you to feel like you are standing there with me.”

His images take months of scouting, preparation and construction to be shot.

They also bring Wilkes into unexpected close encounters, like that with a curious grizzly bear on a shoot in Bella Coola in British Columbia.

“It was terrifying at one moment and then incredibly exciting because I felt this incredible gift,” Wilkes said. “It’s not just about the photograph of a bear. It is a photograph about the way bears lived one this particular day.”

“People think of grizzly bears as not being endangered. But the truth is their habitats are endangered”, Wilkes said.

With over 1 million plant and animal species threatened with extinction, the action from governments is slow. 

Underscoring the complexity of the challenge, some conservationists say there is danger that climate action might produce solutions that are not friendly to protecting biodiversity.

For Wilkes, the ultimate aim is to inspire change.

“We’re reaching a critical path in our history as humanity goes. And so my work now is dedicated to showing people what’s really happening through beauty. I want to inspire change”.

The Festival sponsors a Timothy Allen Photography Scholarship Award (TAPSA), a worldwide search for emerging photographers.

One of the five winners, Greek photographer Anna Pantelia, has turned her attention to the thorny subject of energy transition in her home country.

Despite coal being the single biggest contributor to anthropogenic climate change, Greece has recently made an investment into construction of two new plants.

Pantelia documents both the human cost of coal’s pollution and her region’s dependency on coal for jobs and livelihoods.

“I want to speak with people that have been falling sick out of the coal mining and people that they have lost family members. I want people to get disturbed and I want the decision-makers to be disturbed and think of how we should move forward with the coal mining.”

Kathy Moran, the Deputy Director of Photography at National Geographic, says the role of photography is to provide visual evidence of what is happening to the world.

“I think people need to see what’s happening. Here at Xposure, on the pages of National Geographic, the photography is the proof that the world is changing rapidly.”

Moran, as with many photographers at Xposure, feel excited by the momentum generated by the youth protest movement sweeping the globe.

“There’s a very special moment right now around the Global Climate Strike and these young voices coming up and needing to be heard. I’m hoping that that is what’s going to grab people’s attention and make them start paying attention again to what is happening.” 

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DHL Opens First American High Tech Innovation Center

DHL OPENS NEW AMERCIAS INNOVATION CENTER IN CHICAGO TO ACCELERATE THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW LOGISTICS SOLUTIONS

Chicago, USA – DHL is expanding its global innovation footprint to the Americas region with the grand opening today of its Americas Innovation Center in Chicago. Joining the DHL Innovation Center in Cologne, Germany, and the Asia Pacific Innovation Center in Singapore, the Americas Innovation Center will exhibit technologies that DHL is already implementing across the region as well as investigate and test future solutions that can provide significant productivity and efficiency gains.

Companies exploring new logistics and supply chain technologies have become the focus for venture capital investors. The trend is expected to continue in coming years. DHL’s new state-of-the-art 28,000 square foot facility provides a collaborative space for DHL to work with its customers and its technology partners. The new center showcases technologies that are being tested as well as innovations that have already provided significant productivity increases, especially in peak volume times such as the holiday season, by using various robotic solutions including automated guided vehicles that can ferry goods through warehouses, mobile robots that can facilitate order fulfillment in e-commerce operations and collaborative robots designed to help with repetitive tasks, such as picking and packing.

Establishing the new center in the Americas is a high point in the celebration of DHL’s 50th anniversary this year.

The four DHL business units operating in the Americas are committed to investing in coming years in the development and adoption of new technologies that can improve operations, better the customer experience, lower costs and facilitate better workplace processes for its employees.

As a global leader in logistics, DHL continuously evaluates innovative customer-centric solutions, already implementing a variety of advanced technologies to boost productivity, lower costs and better serve evolving customer needs. For instance, DHL Supply Chain, the contract logistics specialist within Deutsche Post DHL Group, has already seen significant productivity increases, especially in peak season, by using various robotic solutions including automated guided vehicles that can ferry goods through warehouses, mobile robots that can facilitate order fulfillment in e-commerce operations and collaborative robots designed to help with repetitive tasks, such as picking and packing.

As part of its commitment to invest in new technologies, DSC said last November it would be investing $300 million in 2018 and through this year to deploy emerging technologies to 350 of its 430 North American facilities and transportation control towers. The company is also investing in the development of a new digital platform to manage its transportations operations.

DHL Express, the world’s leading international express delivery company, expects to invest about more than $300 million over the next three years to add more automation at its regional hubs, gateways and service centers, introduce robotics to help with shipment loading/unloading, expand the use of AI and machine learning for better route optimization, apply repetitive process automation for billing tasks as well as continue the addition of chatbots and voice recognition tools for bookings, order tracking and improved customer service.

DHL Global Forwarding, the top specialist in air and ocean transport, is working with improved technology to track packages and handle temperature-sensitive shipments as well as implementing warehouse automation with RFID tracking to track cargo location, shipment consolidation and shipping schedules. DGF unveiled yesterday a new advanced data analytics tool designed for clients with highly sensitive cargo such as the life sciences and healthcare sector. It provides quick analysis and insights for better decision-making such as the optimal trade lanes to utilize, verification of temperature controls in transit, and the ability to analyze and reduce risks Like DHL Express, DGF is using virtual reality for employee training programs in several countries in the Americas.

DHL eCommerce Solutions, a major provider of domestic and cross-border delivery services for online retailers, is also using automation and robotics to improve productivity in its distribution centers. It’s utilizing new software solutions to optimize inventory management for its merchants and improve the last-mile delivery experience for consumers.

Sep, 12, 2019

 

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