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Sindika Dokolo thankful to the President of the DRCongo for the opportunity to come back to his country

DCR, 17 May 2019 – Sindika Dokolo thankful to the President of the DRCongo for the opportunity to come back to his country.

Mr. Dokolo told the press at the end of the meeting with the President of he Democratic Republic of Congo that it was exactly four years since he was unable to return to the country following the initiatives he had developed with civil society, as part of the movement “Les Congolais Debout”, which would have been impossible without him.

He reaffirmed his commitment to his country, through the movement “Les Congolais Debout”, to work for the education of the population and the consolidation of the rule of law. He applauded the determination of President Félix-Antoine Tshisekedi Tshilombo in his fight to make the rule of law a living reality in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Mr Dokolo answered the press that he was not a politician but rather a member of the Civil Society deeply committed to doing the right thing. He continued by saying that the development of a country, does not depend only on the policies, but also the commitment of. the civil society and the participation of its citizens”. His business acumen came from a long Line of Congolese entrepreneurs since he is the son of the first Congolese who created a private bank in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

With this in mind he also sees his return to the DRC as a new beginning to contribute to the building of the country through the exploitation of its many and fabulous natural resources thanks to the dynamism of its youth in who needs to be given employment.

May, 17, 2019

 

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2019 Mo Ibrahim Foundation Leadership Ceremony, Ibrahim Forum, Concert

Mo Ibrahim Foundation Leadership Ceremony Honors Kofi Annan; Forum looks at Immigration and Youth Unemployment

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation’s annual Governance Weekend honored the past, assessed crucial African challenges, and spread the message of good governance to a young audience, Friday-Sunday 5-7 April.

The weekend began with a tribute to former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. In speeches from Ibrahim, Ivoirian President Alassane Ouattara, UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed, Bono and former Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Annan’s achievements and legacy were honored. The ceremony also featured music from Congolese singer-songwriter Fally Ipupa.

The Leadership Ceremony is at the heart of the 2019 Ibrahim Governance Weekend, the flagship event of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation which takes place in a different African country each year.

Saturday, 6 April, saw the Ibrahim Forum, which this year focused on Immigration and Youth Unemployment, and featured discussion with President Ouattara, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) Vera Songwe, Founder of the Africa 2.0 Foundation and Chairman and CEO of Ubuntu Capital Mamadou Toure, President of the African Development Bank Group (AfDB) Akinwumi Adesina, and President and Chief Executive of Dangote Group, Chairman of Aliko Dangote Foundation Aliko Dangote.

The weekend ends with its annual concert, bringing the Foundation’s focus on good governance to a wider, younger audience through music. This year’s line-up included Ivoirian artists Shado Chris, Safarel Obiang, and Serge Beynaud, legend Youssou NDour as well as Fally Ipupa.

Shows:

Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire (5 April 2019)

1. Wide shots of arrivals, audience and stage

2. Mo Ibrahim, Founder and Chair, Mo Ibrahim Foundation, welcoming attendees, saying “Tonight actually we are celebrating the legacy of a great son of Arica, Kofi Annan of Ghana. We are celebrating. This is not a wake. This is a party. We’re going to have music; were going to have fun because we are rally grateful for having Kofi in our lives, working with us and inspiring us. So we want to celebrate that; so no handkerchiefs.”

3. Bono speaking about Kofi Annan, saying, “If Kofi was a singer, I thought, ‘What would he be?’ He’d be a crooner, wouldn’t he? I knew he loved Nat King Cole. He was certainly more Bing Crosby than Frank Sinatra. I sang with Frank Sinatra, was proud to, but he had a voice like a fist. Kofi, I thought, turned fists into open hands and outstretched arms.”

4. UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed speaking, saying, “Friends, the world today needs more leaders like Kofi Annan. We are living in a period in which we are finding our core values and our multinational foundations under treat. Inequality is certainly on the rise among and especially within countries. Trust in political establishments is on the decline. Intolerance, extremism and virulent nationalisms are increasingly widespread. People are nervous about jobs and about the prospects of their children’s future. Kofi’s example can inspire us as we seek to meet these challenges, especially in our mother Africa.

Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire (6 April 2019)

5. Shots of audience and forum

6. Former Liberian President and Ibrahim Prize Laureate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf speaking about youth unemployment.

7. Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) Vera Songwe speaking about unemployment, saying, “Rwanda has one of the lowest unemployment rates in Africa. Rwanda is the only country in Africa that has signed the free movement of people. So if you’re an IT specialist on the continent today and you want to move to Rwanda, you go to Rwanda. The good news is also that in West Africa, West Africans, 60 percent of the West Africans say they want more migration. We would say, ‘Are they crazy? Everybody says we don’t want migration. Why are they asking for that?’ And I think Mo talked about it as well.”

8. President and Chief Executive of Dangote Group, Chairman of Aliko Dangote Foundation Aliko Dangote in conversation with Mo Ibrahim, speaking about free trade and corruption.

9. Ivoirian President Alassane Ouattara speaking (French), about open borders.

Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire (7 April 2019)

10. Highlights of Serge Beynaud, Youssou NDour and Fally Ipupa performing.

Other: Notes to Editors

Mo Ibrahim Foundation

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent.

The Foundation, which is a non-grant making organisation, focuses on defining, assessing and enhancing governance and leadership in Africa through four main initiatives:

• Ibrahim Index of African Governance

• Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership

• Ibrahim Forum

• Ibrahim Fellowships and Scholarships

Ibrahim Forum

Established in 2010, the Ibrahim Forum is an annual high-level discussion forum tackling issues of critical importance to Africa. The Forum convenes prominent African political and business leaders, representatives from civil society, multilateral and regional institutions as well as Africa’s major international partners to identify specific policy challenges and priorities for action. Data and research on Forum issues are compiled by the Foundation as the basis for informed and constructive debate.

Ibrahim Prize

The Ibrahim Prize celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is awarded to a former Executive Head of State or Government by an independent Prize Committee. Previous Laureates: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (2018, Liberia), Hifikipunye Pohamba (2014, Namibia), Presidents Joaquim Chissano (2007, Mozambique), Festus Mogae (2008, Botswana) and Pedro Pires (2011, Cabo Verde), as well as the 2007 Honorary Ibrahim Laureate – President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

Further contacts:

For more information, please visit: www.moibrahimfoundation.org

You can also follow the Mo Ibrahim Foundation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr:

Twitter: @Mo_IbrahimFdn

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/moibrahimfoundation.org

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/moibrahimfoundation 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/moibrahimfoundation/

ENDS

Dangote, Chevron Nigeria Sign Historic Agreement on Gas Supply

Dangote Fertilizer Limited has entered into a long-term agreement with Chevron Nigeria Limited (CNL) for the delivery of Natural Gas from Chevron’s supply portfolio to the fertilizer plant, which is poised to start operations soon.

The contract, under the Gas Sale and Aggregation Agreement (GSAA) is part of International Oil Company (IOC)’s gas obligation to the domestic market through the Gas Aggregation Company Limited (GACN).

The signing ceremony, held at the Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR) office in Lagos, was executed on behalf of the parties by Group Executive Director, Strategy, Capital Projects & Portfolio Development, Dangote Industries Limited, Devakumar Edwin; Chairman/Managing Director, Chevron Nigeria Limited (CNL), Jeffrey Ewing; Head, Gas Monitoring & Regulation Division, Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR), Sanya Bajomo; and Managing Director/CEO, Gas Aggregation Company Nigeria Limited (GACN), Engr. Morgan Okwoche.

Dangote Fertilizer Limited, which is ready to be commissioned before the end of this year, will produce 3.0 million metric tonnes per annum (mmtpa) of Urea.

The fertilizer plant consists of twin train, with each single train having a capacity of 1.5 million tonnes per annum of Urea and Ammonia, which makes each of them the largest train available in the world. Hence the total capacity of the plant is 3 million tonnes per annum, and it sits on an area of 500 hectares.

Speaking at the signing ceremony, Group Executive Director, Strategy, Capital Projects & Portfolio Development, DIL, Devakumar Edwin, commended the Managing Director of GACN for his role in the new business relationship between Dangote Fertilizer Limited and Chevron Nigeria Limited.

He said the company is looking forward to having a long-term relationship with Chevron Nigeria Limited as well as synergies in other upstream and wider areas of operations in the oil and gas sector.

Chairman/Managing Director, CNL, Jeffrey Ewing commended GACN, DPR for helping with the signing of the gas supply agreement. He said: “We are looking forward to working with Dangote Fertilizer and maintaining a good relationship with the company. This agreement is very important for the country and Chevron is committed to Nigeria’s economic development.”  

The Managing Director/CEO, GACN, Morgan Okwoche, expressed delight to be part of the domestic gas agreement. “This is the beginning of fruitful relationship between Dangote Fertilizer Limited, Chevron Nigeria Limited and other parties. I am excited that this is happening during my term in office. You cannot imagine my satisfaction in having this contract signed at this time,” he said.

Head, Gas Monitoring & Regulation Division, DPR, Sanya Bajomo, said: “I am glad that GACN, Chevron and Dangote have signed this gas supply agreement. I want to say that this gas supply agreement is an issue of national interest and what happened today is going to be transmitted to the presidency. I believe everybody is going to benefit from this agreement when the fertilizer plant starts operation.”

Shows:

DSC_8633: L-R: Chairman/Managing Director, Chevron Nigeria Limited (CNL), Jeffrey Ewing; Managing Director/CEO, Gas Aggregation Company Nigeria Limited (GACN), Engr. Morgan Okwoche; Head, Gas Monitoring & Regulation Division, Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR), Sanya Bajomo; and Group Executive Director, Strategy, Capital Projects & Portfolio Development, Dangote Industries Limited, Devakumar Edwin, at the signing of Gas Supply and Aggregation Agreement (GSAA) between CNL, GACN and  Dangote Fertilizer Limited on Monday, February 25, 2019.

DSC_8641: L-R: Chairman/Managing Director, Chevron Nigeria Limited (CNL), Jeffrey Ewing; Head, Gas Monitoring & Regulation Division, Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR), Sanya Bajomo; Managing Director/CEO, Gas Aggregation Company Nigeria Limited (GACN), Engr. Morgan Okwoche; and Group Executive Director, Strategy, Capital Projects & Portfolio Development, Dangote Industries Limited, Devakumar Edwin, at the signing of Gas Supply and Aggregation Agreement (GSAA) between CNL, GACN and  Dangote Fertilizer Limited on Monday, February 25, 2019.

DSC_8636: L-R: Chairman/Managing Director, Chevron Nigeria Limited (CNL), Jeffrey Ewing; Managing Director/CEO, Gas Aggregation Company Nigeria Limited (GACN), Engr. Morgan Okwoche; Head, Gas Monitoring & Regulation Division, Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR), Sanya Bajomo; and Group Executive Director, Strategy, Capital Projects & Portfolio Development, Dangote Industries Limited, Devakumar Edwin, at the signing of Gas Supply and Aggregation Agreement (GSAA) between CNL, GACN and  Dangote Fertilizer Limited on Monday, February 25, 2019.

Mar, 15, 2019

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Former Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf Receives The Ibrahim Award For Outstanding Leadership In Africa

KIGALI, RWANDA – Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the former President of Liberia, last night accepted the 2017 Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership at a special Leadership Ceremony in Kigali, Rwanda.

Speaking to guests from Rwanda and around the world, President Sirleaf said: “As the first woman to receive this awards, it is my hope that women and girls across Africa are inspired to break down barriers, to push back. Where there is a first, there will be a second and a third, and a fourth… My fierce progression towards democratic values, as demonstrated by a successful 2018 transition is reflective of Africa’s quest for democracy. It is a continuum of the continent’s struggle for liberation and freedom. As Nelson Mandela said in March of 1991, ‘I belong to the generation of leaders for whom the achievement of democracy was the defining challenge.’ The trend remains encouraging, as young people empowered by technology demand a right to be heard to be listened to. Africa’s evolution illustrates the strong causal effects between democracy and development.”

The Ibrahim Prize recognises and celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is a US$5 million award paid over 10 years, and US$200,000 annually for life thereafter.

Presenting the Prize to President Sirleaf, Salim Ahmed Salim, Chair of the independent Prize Committee, said: “She courageously embraced opponents and fought for generational change, and paved the way for her successor to follow. Her achievements have inspired and given confidence to millions of women, and may I add, men, in public service.”

Praising President Sirleaf, Alassane Ouattara, President of neighbouring Cote d’Ivoire, said: “Since becoming president, clearly you have succeeded in restoring confidence and hope for the Liberian people and under difficult circumstances. You have undertaken courageous institutional and economic reforms. And thanks to you, Liberia is recognized today, throughout Africa and beyond, for your strong and credible democratic institutions.”

Mo Ibrahim, founder of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, said: “It is wonderful to have a winner this year, and it is also wonderful that the winner is a she. How fitting that President Sirleaf is honoured here in Rwanda, as nobody has done more for women, and the gender issue, than Rwanda.”

Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda, said: “Leadership is both a privilege and a duty. It is best measured in terms of concrete results that citizens can feel in their everyday lives as well as the level of trust that they have in public institutions. During our time in office we must work as hard as we can to do the right things for our people’s future.”

The Leadership Ceremony is at the heart of the 2018 Ibrahim Governance Weekend, the flagship event of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation which takes place in a different African country each year. 

Shows:

1. Exterior views of the Kigali Conference Centre

2. Interiors shots and forum hall

3. Former South African Minister of Finance Trevor Manuel walking with former Nigerian Minister of Finance Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

4. Former President of Cape Verde and 2011 Ibrahim Prize laureate Pedro Pires arriving in hall

5. Former President of Liberia Ellen Johnson Sirleaf arriving in hall with Rwandan President Paul Kagame

6. Dancers and music

7. Wide shot of Kagame on stage

8. Kagame saying: Leadership is both a privilege and a duty. It is best measured in terms of concrete results that citizens can feel in their everyday lives as well as the level of trust that they have in public institutions.

9. Mo Ibrahim, founder of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, saying: Brothers and sisters, it is wonderful to have a winner this year, and it is also wonderful that the winner is a she. How fitting that President Sirleaf is honoured here in Rwanda, as nobody has done more for women, and the gender issue, than Rwanda. Nobody really addressed the gender issue as comprehensively as this country.

10. Cote d’Ivoire President Alassane Outarra on stage

11. Outarra saying: Since becoming president, clearly you have succeeded in restoring confidence and hope for the Liberian people and under difficult circumstances. You have undertaken courageous institutional and economic reforms. And thanks to you, Liberia is recognized today, throughout Africa and beyond, for your strong and credible democratic institutions.  

12. Salim Ahmed Salim, Chair of the independent Prize Committee speaking about President Sirleaf: She courageously embraced opponents and fought for generational change, and paved the way for her successor to follow. Her achievements have inspired and given confidence to millions of women, in public service. and may I add, not only to women but an inspiration to men.

13. Audience applauding

14. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former president of Liberia and Ibrahim 2017 Prize laureate on stage.

15. Sirleaf saying: As the first woman to receive this awards, it is my hope that women and girls across Africa are inspired to break down barriers, to push back. Where there is a first, there will be a second and a third, and a fourth.

16. Sirleaf saying: My fierce progression towards democratic values, as demonstrated by a successful 2018 transition is reflective of Africa’s quest for democracy. It is a continuum of the continent’s struggle for liberation and freedom. As Nelson Mandela said in March of 1991, “I belong to the generation of leaders for whom the achievement of democracy was the defining challenge.” The trend remains encouraging, as young people empowered by technology demand a right to be heard to be listened to. Africa’s evolution illustrates the strong causal effects between democracy and development.

17. Presidents, former presidents and prize committee members gather on stage

18. Liberian singer Phionah Mbabazi supported by her band and dancers from the Nyundo School of Music

19. Liberian band The Ben performingalso supported by a band from the Nyundo School of Music.   

Other: Notes to Editors

Mo Ibrahim Foundation

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent.

The Foundation, which is a non-grant making organisation, focuses on defining, assessing and enhancing governance and leadership in Africa through four main initiatives:

• Ibrahim Index of African Governance

• Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership

• Ibrahim Forum

• Ibrahim Fellowships and Scholarships

Ibrahim Forum

Established in 2010, the Ibrahim Forum is an annual high-level discussion forum tackling issues of critical importance to Africa. The Forum convenes prominent African political and business leaders, representatives from civil society, multilateral and regional institutions as well as Africa’s major international partners to identify specific policy challenges and priorities for action. Previous Forums have dealt with: Africa at the Tipping Point (2017), Urbanisation (2015), Africa in the next 50 years (2013), African Youth (2012), African Agriculture (2011) and African Regional Economic Integration (2010). Data and research on Forum issues are compiled by the Foundation as the basis for informed and constructive debate.

Ibrahim Prize

The Ibrahim Prize celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is awarded to a former Executive Head of State or Government by an independent Prize Committee. Previous Laureates: Hifikipunye Pohamba (2014, Namibia), Presidents Joaquim Chissano (2007, Mozambique), Festus Mogae (2008, Botswana) and Pedro Pires (2011, Cabo Verde). The 2007 Honorary Ibrahim Laureate – President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

 

Media releases, photographs and other detailed resources will be available for all media.

You will be able to watch the Broadcast live on the Foundation’s website.

You can follow the Foundation on Twitter: @Mo_IbrahimFdn

Suggested hashtags to comment #MIFKigali

Contacts:

For more information, please visit: www.moibrahimfoundation.org

You can also follow the Mo Ibrahim Foundation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr:

Twitter: @Mo_IbrahimFdn

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/moibrahimfoundation.org

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/moibrahimfoundation 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/moibrahimfoundation/

ENDS

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10th Release Of Ibrahim Index Of African Governance

LONDON, UK – Progress in African governance over the last decade is significant but held back by deterioration in Safety and Rule of Law

The 2016 Ibrahim Index of African Governance (IIAG), the 10th release by the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, reveals overall improvement in governance over the past ten years, with some deterioration in one category: Safety and Rule of Law. 37 countries, which are home to 70% of African citizens, registered progress across Human Development, Participation and Human Rights and Sustainable Economic Opportunity.

Story: The tenth edition of the IIAG, the most comprehensive analysis of African governance undertaken to date, brings together a decade of data to assess each of Africa’s 54 countries against 95 indicators drawn from 34 independent sources. This year, for the first time, the IIAG includes Public Attitude Survey data from Afrobarometer. This captures Africans’ own perceptions of governance, which provide fresh perspective on the results registered by other data such expert assessment and official data. In fact, according to Mo Ibrahim Foundation Founder and Chair Mo Ibrahim, the disparity shows that citizens are raising their expectations, a feeling echoed by former UN Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos.

Over the last decade, overall governance has improved by one score point at the continental average level, with 37 countries – home to 70% of African citizens – registering progress. This overall positive trend has been led mainly by improvement in Human Development and Participation & Human Rights. Sustainable Economic Opportunity also registered an improvement, but at a slower pace. However, these positive trends stand in contrast to a pronounced and concerning drop in Safety & Rule of Law, for which 33 out of the 54 African countries – home to almost two-thirds of the continent’s population – have experienced a decline since 2006, 15 of them quite substantially.

This worrying trend has worsened recently, with almost half of the countries on the continent recording their worst score ever in this category within the last three years. This is driven by large deteriorations in the subcategories of Personal Safety and National Security. Notably, Accountability is now the lowest scoring subcategory of the whole Index. Without exception, all countries that have deteriorated at the Overall Governance level have also deteriorated in Safety & Rule of Law.

38 countries – together accounting for 73% of continental GDP – have recorded an improvement over the last decade. The largest progress has been achieved in the sub-category Infrastructure, driven by a massive improvement in the indicator Digital & IT Infrastructure, the most improved of all 95 indicators. However, the average score for Infrastructure still remains low, with the indicator Electricity Infrastructure registering a particularly worrying decline in 19 countries, home to 40% of Africa’s population.

Shows:

1. Graphics about the Ibrahim Index

2. Shots of dais and audience

3. Mo Ibrahim Foundation Founder and Chair Mo Ibrahim speaking about the Ibrahim Index of African Governance, saying: We see an improvement. It’s not a fantastic improvement, but it is an improvement. So: good news, but not fantastic news. We also notice that actually it’s 2000 to 2005 and 2006, there was the greatest improvement in governance, actually. There was real improvement there. But after that it started to slow down. And for two or three years now we have been raising the issue about this stagnation. Somehow people got a little bit too comfortable. And I think we really need to continue the work. It is challenging. That is an improvement, it’s not a fantastic improvement; it’s not enough.

4. Ibrahim saying: It’s the job of the government to deliver public goods to the population, and as such it is measurable – you can measure this. We want to move the narrative from, “I like this president because he speaks well, or he sings well or he dances well,” to: “What actually has he delivered over the year? What actually did he deliver to his people? That will be the way we evaluate our government and the way we wish the conversation between civil society, governments, business, all stakeholders, to be – around facts, about data.

5. Ibrahim saying: It is really interesting. While in this case data proves there is actually improvement in health and education, actually the African people’s perception is different. And that raises the question: Is that because people’s

expectations are getting higher now, so they are not really satisfied with what is being given? Is it social media now giving people that view of what is available, of what really happens, what guys are getting in other continents compared to what we are doing here? It is something we really need to understand and really look in to a little bit more.

6. Former Botswana President and winner of the Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership Festus Mogae, saying: The Index perhaps is the one thing that can help, since we all read it, as leaders, and think of it in our own privacy, and see where we have been placed. I think that’s perhaps the most effective weapon against corruption and fraud. And as far as citizens are concerned, governments that want to fight corruption – they can do so.

7. Ngaire Woods, Dean, Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, saying: Ten years ago, people would talk about “the Africa premium”, or “the Africa Penalty” – the penalty that African countries across the continent paid because they had poor governance. And what the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, and the Ibrahim Index have done is given us real information, year on year, about what governance in each of the 54 countries of the continent looks like. And that’s shown people, first, that governance in many countries is good and improving, that there isn’t an Africa-wide story. It’s enabled people to think very carefully and use this dashboard to make nuanced decisions. And second, it has shown the importance that real information can keep you ahead of the curve.

8. Jendayi Frazer, President and CEO of 50 Ventures, LLC; former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs, saying: If you look at it as a balance, and look at all four major indicators, there is reason to be optimistic. Governance has actually gone up. Not as fast as it should because I think personal security and national security – Personal Safety and National Security indicators are dragging it down. But definitely if we can have interventions that are smart and that help society itself address its problems towards sustainable peace, then I am very optimistic.

9. Donald Kaberuka, former President of the African Development Bank and Chair of the Board of Directors, saying: Economics may be doing very well, but attention must focus on distribution and inclusion is vital. Now, the fact that rural economies are improving is good, gender attention is good, but the education quality issue worries me enormously. And I hope policy-makers look at the demographic dynamics: So, child mortality is down; attendance in school is up; but education outcomes are falling. That suggest to me that it could be a problem in the next 20 years, when the famous “demographic dividend” shows up.

10. Abdoulie Janneh, Executive Director, Liaison with Governments and Institutions in Africa for the Mo Ibrahim Foundation; former UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Africa, (UNECA), saying: Mechanisms have been put in place to minimize. Look, there is no country where there is no corruption, but the question is, let’s do our best to minimize it, to make sure there is no impunity when people are corrupt and held accountable. I think that’s the general trend in Africa. The awareness is here, the willingness, and the determination to say, “Let us do something about it.” I think I feel that in the continent.

11. Abdalla Hamdok, Chair of the Ibrahim Index of African Governance Advisory Committee; Deputy Executive Secretary, Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), saying: Any serious government in the continent today won’t wait to see itself in the Index. Is it going up? Is it going down? So the Index is essentially addressing the fact of the assessment that: If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.” And this is why the Index is here to stay.

12. Valerie Amos, Director of SOAS; former UN Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, saying: There are some really positive things that have come out of the Index this year. Looking at it over a 10-year trajectory, I was particularly struck by the Human Development indicators. If you look at education, if you look at health, if you look at welfare, there has been a sustained increase in all of those indicators on the continent. Now, that doesn’t necessarily match with people’s perceptions of where things are. But I think the fact that the data is telling us that things are improving, against the backdrop of where people’s expectations are rising, I think that could only be a good thing.

13. Mohamed ElBaradei, former Director-General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Ibrahim Prize committee member, speaking in Arabic: You cannot separate the Rule of Law from the overall indicators. What we are trying to do is measure all the indicators in Africa. How we can measure how the people in Africa can catch up with the rest of the world and become free and prosperous. And what we see right now is that Personal Safety, Rule of Law is not as it should be in fact it is deteriorating, but I have to look at “Why this is happening? Is it because political participation is not as good as it should be? Human rights are not in good shape?” People feel unemployment, corruption. When you have that, we have a tendency to say that we people can’t identify with government and we will take the government into our own hands.

 

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The Mo Ibrahim Foundation Governance Weekend

Africa’s cities are vibrant centres of innovation, business growth, and social inclusion, which can drive significant GDP growth across the continent. They are also home to some of the world’s largest slums, suffer from inadequate infrastructure and lack of opportunity.

The 2015 Ibrahim Forum, dedicated to “African Urban Dynamics” brought together politicians, policy makers, business leaders and civil society representatives from Africa and Africa’s international partners to explore those countervailing forces.

Mo Ibrahim, Founder and Chairman of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation which established the Forum in 2010, opened the session by noting that cities are incubators for finding innovative solutions to some of the biggest problems facing Africa, around the environment, development, food security and other issues.

Ghana’s Minister of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration Hanna Tetteh noted that the great cities of Africa like Lagos, Johannesburg, Nairobi or Accra, also face some of the greatest challenges. And it is important to be honest about those challenges.

Akinwumi Adesina, President, African Development Bank, noted that 24 cities represent 44 percent of GDP in Africa. So how those cities deal with sanitation, health, power and the effects of increased populations will have an amplified impact on the continent.

Kumi Naidoo, International Executive Director, Greenpeace International, said that dealing with these issues was urgent, and that the current state of urban Africa was creating a potentially volatile situation.

Vera Songwe, Regional Director for West and Central Africa, International Finance Corporation, said that inefficiency in government feed economic inefficiency and added to urban struggles. As an example, she noted that 54 percent of people on the electricity grid in Lagos also have generators, doubling their real energy cost, and all based on their distrust of the local government’s ability to guarantee a supply.

Patricia de Lille, Mayor of Cape Town, South Africa, challenged her fellow mayors to always include a social development strategy alongside plans for business development because, “They are two sides of the same coin.”

Khalifa Sall, Mayor of Dakar, Senegal, noted that the influx of people from rural areas was making every inch of an African city a place of commerce or of living.

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent.

The Ibrahim Forum is its annual high-level discussion forum tackling issues of critical importance to Africa. Previous Forums have dealt with Africa in the next 50 years (2013), Youth (2012), Agriculture (2011) and Regional Economic Integration (2010).

In addition to the Ibrahim Forum, the Foundation releases the annual Ibrahim Index of African Governance, which has become an important policy tool used in African and global finance and government circles; the Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership, which was presented earlier in the Governance Weekend, to former Namibian president Hifikepunye Lucas Pohamba at a music-filled ceremony Friday night (20 November); and the Ibrahim Fellowships and Scholarships program, which places promising young African leaders in high-profile agencies.

The Foundation also finds ways to reach new audiences with its message.

A concert of African musicians drew some 40-thousand people to Independence Square that evening (21 November). International superstars Angelique Kidjo from Benin and Youssou N’Dour from Senegal, who was

once called “the most famous musician in Africa”, headlined along with younger artists Stonebwoy and Sarkodie, two of the hottest rising stars in Africa, both BET Awards winners and both from Ghana.

The weekend ended on Sunday 22 November with the Governance Cup, a football match sponsored by the Foundation between a “Dream Team” of Ghana All-Stars and African Club Champions TP Mazembe from the Democratic Republic of Congo, owned by former governor of Katanga Province Moise Katumbi. He underscored the Foundation’s goal of introducing governance issues to young people and the general public through popular culture and sports. Ghanaian President John Mahamba agreed, saying, “In Ghana we say we have two passions: politics and soccer. So I guess you can tell that Ghanaians are very happy about this football match.”

Though the Ghanaians had several opportunities, TP Mazembe won the friendly match, 3-1.

 

Shows: Accra, Ghana (21 November 2015)

1. Various shots of the International Conference Centre in Accra

2. Various shots of audience

3. Mo Ibrahim Foundation Founder and Chairman, Mo Ibrahim saying, “Cities are rising now as a key element in the world order. Their GDP is huge. And mayors have proved they can be more efficient, more effective than governments. If you watch what happens in some of the major cities in the world and see how they are far ahead of their governments in implementing really key issues when it comes to climate, to development, innovative solutions are coming from cities. That is really important for us.”

4. Ghana Minister of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration Hanna Tetteh saying, “Cities are some of the most dynamic spaces in our continent. When you look at cities like Lagos, like Abuja, like Johannesburg, like Cape Town, like Nairobi, like Abidjan, like my city of Accra, immediately when you the names of these cities come to mind you think of vibrant spaces. And you think of energy and entrepreneurship, the promise that Africa shows coming out of these spaces. But at the same time, in these cities we also have some of the biggest slums, which are growing at wonderful rates. And at the same time, we also have to deal with our fair share of challenges.”

5. Akinwumi Adesina, President, African Development Bank, saying, “You have a situation where today, 24 cities account for 44 percent of the GDP in Africa, so what we do with cities is important. So how we light up cities is important. How we feed cities is important. The kind of infrastructure, the water health and sanitation that we get for cities are very important. And how we deal with the pattern if migration into the cities will determine the extent to which the cities themselves can become more resilient going forward.

6. Kumi Naidoo, International Executive Director, Greenpeace International, saying, “We need to recognise that as we sit here right now, that without any further migration into our cities that our cities are actually tinder boxes and powder kegs waiting to explode.”

7. Vera Songwe, Regional Director for West and Central Africa, International Finance Corporation, saying, “If we can build that public space of trust, then we can begin to change. Let me give you a concrete example. In Nigeria today, 54 percent of the eight million people who are connected to electricity in Lagos have generators. That is a sign that they don’t trust the government. They know that when they wake up in the morning they won’t have electricity. So what do they do? They double the price of energy a buy a generator.”

8. Patricia de Lille, Mayor of Cape Town, South Africa, saying, “And where are we now in Africa? Africa is on the rise. And we must rise as African leaders and design a template, a new template, how to adapt existing cities so that they can fit into and deal with urbanization, So you have to have an economic growth strategy for your city, you need to have a social development strategy for your city because economic development and social development are two sides of the same coin.”

9. Khalifa Sall, Mayor of Dakar, Senegal, saying (French), “The problem we have in African cities is that public space is not just for vehicles. It is for the public. And the public is real people. That’s the first thing we have to realise. And in African cities, rural migration is transforming every public space into a place of commerce or of living.”

10. Various shots of crowds at Independence Square

11. Angelique Kidjo performing

12. Sarkodie performing

13. Stonebwoy performing

14. Youssou N’Dour performing

(22 November 2015)

15. Various shots of Ghana National Stadium

16. Crowds arriving

17. TP Mazembe owner Moise Katumbi saying (French), “You know it is for good governance in Africa above all democracy. The Ibrahim Forum this time was about the economics and politics of urbanism. So the players participate in this as well. People will come to the match as well to see Mazembe. So it is a way to communicate as with all the people of Africa.”

18. TP Mazembe team going onto the field

19. Ghana President John Mohamba arriving with Mo Ibrahim

20. Mohamba saying, “In Ghana we say we have two passions: politics and soccer. So I guess you can tell that Ghanaians are very happy about this football match.”

21. Crowd shots

22. Ghana has some near misses

23. TP Mazembe’s Daniel Nii Adjei scores the first goal

24. TP Mazembe’s Meschak Elia scores their second goal

25. Ghana Dream Team player Godfred Saka scores the team’s only goal

26. Mo Ibrahim presenting the Governance Cup

27. TP Mazembe team members holding the Governance Cup

ENDS

Nov, 22, 2015

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