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Unite For The Great Barrier Reef – A New Social Movement

NEW SOCIAL MOVEMENT CALLS GLOBAL CITIZENS TO UNITE FOR GREAT BARRIER REEF. 

ACTION – NOT APATHY – NOW NEEDED

•New social movement uses digital technology to mobilise support for the Great Barrier Reef.

•Sign up to citizensgbr.org to become a Citizen of the Great Barrier Reef and take simple actions that feed into a global dashboard that tracks the cumulative impact.

•The new movement launches today, midway through a split coral spawning season; a powerful reminder that the Great Barrier Reef is still alive and that action – not apathy – will secure its future.

•To show support, Citizens can claim a colour of the Great Barrier Reef, flooding their own social media feeds with vivid pops of colour.

November 28, 2017, Cairns QueenslandA new social movement launched in Cairns today aims to put vivid pops of colour into millions of social media feeds as a global network of people unite to support the Great Barrier Reef.

Spearheaded by Earth Hour founder, Andy Ridley, Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef uses digital technology to mobilise individuals to take simple actions that will track their impact on the Reef.

The actions, which range from saying no to straws to donating funds to the Crown of Thorns Starfish eradication program, collectively feed into a global dashboard that tracks the mass impact of each person’s choices.

Mr Ridley launched the movement today midway between a split coral spawning season, a powerful symbol of ongoing life on the Great Barrier Reef and a reminder that it’s action – not apathy – that will secure the reef’s future.

“We are in the middle of a split spawning, an event where the reef, the animals, the clams, and the coral, spawn and regenerate,” said Mr Ridley.

“We launched Citizens at exactly the same time, essentially trying to recreate and mimic nature and do a social spawning.”

Ridley added that Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef shows that an action on one side of the planet can make a difference for the whole planet.

“As an individual citizen, everything you do will make a difference,” Mr Ridley said.

“Whether it’s making a decision about never using one-use water bottles or take-away cups; even these small decisions when you scale them up to many, many millions, it starts to make a massive difference.

“There are already citizens on the reef working their guts out to try and make sure it’s protected and saved, but we need all of humanity to unite to protect the Great Barrier Reef.

“Whether you are in Rio, Amsterdam or Beijing, we need your help. We need you to become a Citizen and unite for the Great Barrier Reef.”

Sixty-five kilometres out to sea from Port Douglas, snorkelers on the Great Barrier Reef today agreed with the concept of Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef.

Ruth Ogier, 44-years old from London who joined the Diver’s Den trip said the reef is definitely worth protecting.

“Today was so clear, I could see so many different types of fish –  really brightly coloured – and lots of different corals. It was amazing.”

“I think it’s a great idea, making sure everyone feels globally connected to this space, and protecting it for the future.”

Meanwhile, 28-year old Chen Chen, from Shenzhen in China snorkelled the reef for her first time and saw “fabulous corals, in all different colours – purple, pink, yellow, blue.”

“I can’t describe my feelings; (it’s) the first time I see such beautiful nature. We must do everything we can do to protect (it) including use less plastic things, straws, and use more recyclable energy.

Nakita Russell, 24-years old from Fiji can’t wait to sign up for Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef.

“I think everybody should sign up for it. I don’t think it should be a second thought. I think it should be compulsory. And yes, I will be signing up to it. Right now.”

CEO of Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef, Mr Ridley said it’s easy to become a Citizen.

“You just go to the site citizensgbr.org, you sign up and then you start to choose the actions you are going to take.”

By signing up to citizengbr.org, individuals and organisations can claim their own colour of the reef and through social media networks encourage friends, families, supporters and clients to do the same.

Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef also supports reef management and conservation projects along the 2,300 kilometres stretch of Queensland’s coastline. These include tackling outbreaks of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish, protecting endangered loggerhead turtle habitat and supporting graziers to decrease sediment runoff into Reef catchments.

Join the movement today by becoming a Citizen of the Great Barrier Reef at citizensgbr.org. 

Shows:

– Diver’s Den Great Barrier Reef Day Trip on Aquaquest

– First site: Beer Garden, 65km north east of Port Douglas

– Second site: Stonehenge, 65km north east of Port Douglas.

– Regrowth: Ribbon Reef middle between two preservation zones.

 

00:00     Aerials of AquaQuest reef vessel traveling 65km north east of Port Douglas

00:10     Aerial of snorkelers at Beer Garden Reef

00:15     Shots of Beer Garden Reef and swimmer

00:18     Anemones and clown fish

00:34     Anemones and clown fish with divers looking on

00:45     Andy Ridley, CEO Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef … “It’s really easy to become a citizen, you just go to the site citizensgbr.org, you sign up and then you start to choose the actions you are going  take.

00:54     “As an individual citizen, everything you do will make a difference, so whether or not it’s making a decision about never using one-use water bottles or take away cups. Even these small decisions when you scale them up to the many many millions, starts to make a massive difference.

01:10     “There are already citizens on the reef itself working their guts out to try and make sure it’s protected and saved, but we need all of humanity to unite to protect the Great Barrier Reef. So whether you are in Rio, Amsterdam or Beijing, we need your help. We need you to become a Citizen and unite for the Great Barrier Reef.

01:26     “Out there are the moment, we are in the middle of a split spawning, so ahh, this is where the reef, animals, clams, the coral itself spawn so it ahhh regenerates. Some people call it the greatest orgasm on the planet. So we try to do the launch of Citizens at exactly the same time essentially trying to recreate and mimic nature and do a social spawning.

01:46     Coral spawning at Moore Reef November 10, 2017

02:16     Divers and snorkelers entering the Great Barrier Reef at Beer Garden Reef

02:53     Interview with Takuma Sato, 36 years old from Chiba Ken, Japan ……(translation to English from Japanese) “It was beautiful, the coral and fish. Errrr. There was absolutely no rubbish at all. We must try and keep it as it is, just like this.”

03:13     Interview with Chen Chen, 28 years from Shenzhen, China.… “Actually, when I dive into the sea, I can see fabulous corals. Different colours; purple, pink, yellow, blue. All kinds of colours of corals and all kinds of fish.

03:26     “It’s really marvellous, fabulous. I can’t describe my feeling. The first time I see such beautiful nature things.

04:35     “We must do everything we can do to protect them including use less plastic things, straws, and use more recyclable energy, something like that.

04:47 Interview with Chen Chen, (translation to English from Chinese/Mandarin) “When I was diving I saw glorious corals of different colours that I’ve never imagined. Purple. Pink. And all sizes of fish just like we saw in the magazine and the TV. It was amazing. It’s hard to find a word to describe how I felt.

04:05     We should do more to protect them. For example, use less plastic bags and other plastic things including plastic straws and we should use recyclable energy. If we do more to protect the environment, more people can have the chance to see the miracle of the nature.

04:22     Ruth Ogier, 44 years old from London, UK…. “It’s definitely worth protecting. Today was so clear, I could just see many different types of fish really brightly coloured, lots of different corals. It was amazing. Really really good.

04:32     “I think it’s a great idea, in making sure everyone feels globally connected to this space, protecting it for the future.

04:39     Nakita Russell, 24 years old from Fiji …  “Today was amazing, to see it from – you can snorkel and you can snorkel, but when you are underneath the water, it’s completely different. You can’t even compare it. And I just saw everything.

04:51     “I think everybody should sign up for it. I don’t think it should be a second thought. I think it should be compulsory. And yes, I will be signing up to it. Right now.

05:00     Shots of Beer Garden Reef 65 km north east of Port Douglas

05:11     Shot of Stonehenge Reef snorkelers and divers, 65km north east of Port Douglas

05:57 Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef promo video with Teresa Palmer

ENDS 06:52

Other:

About the Great Barrier Reef:

The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s biggest coral reef system and the largest living thing on Earth, stretching 2,300 kilometres from the tip of the Cape York Peninsula to Bundaberg. It is Queensland’s most valuable tourism asset with around two million visitors experiencing the reef each year. As a custodian of the Reef, Queensland’s tourism industry is committed to responsible practices, as well as actively participating in programs to protect Reef health and build resilience. Anyone who visits the Reef with a commercial operator contributes an Environmental Management Charge of $6.50 per day to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, which is vital in supporting day-to-day management of the marine park. More information: queensland.com/greatbarrierreef

About Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef:

Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef is a social movement with a difference. A digitally-focused organisation for the 21st century, it is a collaborative global movement driven by technology with one aim: to engage mainstream society on a mass scale and to mobilise a global network of Citizens committed to taking real action for the Reef.

By starting conversations, and connecting local and global issues, Citizens will engage people, innovators and organisations from around the world in the future of the Reef. Liking Citizens on Facebook is not enough. Individuals are asked to take local and global actions with measurable outcomes. Citizens is the ultimate sharing platform designed to showcase the most innovative, inspiring and impactful actions and get involved. Backed by the world’s best reef management agency, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), the movement is also supported by more than 340 tourism operators who bring thousands of people daily to experience the Reef.

Lights On! It’s Time To Shine For Super-Sized Vivid Sydney 2017

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA –

Vivid Sydney will bathe Sydney in breathtaking colour and a dizzying array of special effects as the world’s largest festival of light, music, and ideas switches on for 23 nights from 6pm tonight, 26 May 2017.

Featuring seven light precincts and more than 90 large scale light installations and projections, Vivid Sydney will run bigger, bolder, and brighter until 17 June.

NSW Minister for Tourism and Major Events Adam Marshall said “It’s all systems go as the city becomes a massive, creative canvas from tonight, with art and technology coming together to present awe-inspiring creations conjured by some of the world’s leading creative minds and technology innovators.”

“Visitors to Vivid Sydney come for the lights and stay for the sights of this great State.  In 2016, Vivid Sydney welcomed a record-breaking 2.31 million attendees. In 2017, we’re hoping to surpass last year’s massive $110 million injection into our State’s visitor economy,” he said.

More than 180 local and international artists have created the light installations and projections for Vivid Sydney, including The Rocks, Campbell’s Cove, Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, Taronga Zoo, Martin Place, Darling Harbour and festival debutante, Barangaroo (South).

Projections will illuminate iconic buildings and landmarks throughout the city including the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia as well as the organic backdrops of enormous trees and natural rockscapes in the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney.

The ultimate canvas, the Sails of the Sydney Opera House will feature Audio Creatures, an indescribable world of colour and light, featuring imaginary sea creatures lurking deep in the harbour and shimmering plant life.

Special effects and animations are found at every turn, from the ground below visitors’ feet at Barangaroo (South), to Darling Harbour’s Magicians of the Mist, a 50 metre high water fountain featuring 40 metre high projections, lasers, fireworks, flame and a dramatic soundtrack.

North of the harbour, a steampunk waterworld themed adventure awaits in Chatswood, while giant illuminated lanterns of endangered animals are sparking conversations about conservation at Taronga Zoo.

Destination NSW Chief Executive Officer and Executive Producer of Vivid Sydney Sandra Chipchase said “Over the next 23 days, visitors can take their pick of hundreds of events, including more than 284 Vivid Ideas discussions and creative forums in 59 venues, that will explore our creative future, or more than 390 Vivid Music performances in more than 40 venues, featuring a range of genres from indie folk and electronic music to musical theatre and jazz.”

Festival highlights include:

Light

Lighting the Sails: Audio Creatures: The Sails of the World-Heritage listed Sydney Opera House will be brought to life by Audio Creatures: a series of imaginary creatures curated and designed by visionary director Ash Bolland. Audio Creatures will feature morphing and mesmeric marine creatures and plant life, cut with sleek futuristic technology across the iconic Sails. Audio Creatures will be set to a bespoke soundtrack by Brazilian electronic producer Amon Tobin.

Organic Vibrations: Australian contemporary artist Julia Gorman and French collective Danny Rose will create a new artwork projected onto the heritage-listed façade of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA).  The installation will use projection-mapping techniques to bring to life images originally made by Gorman in watercolour, oils, and marker pen depicting sinuous lines and colours inspired by the natural world. (The Rocks)

Magicians of the Mist: Fantastical fountains, flame jets, lasers, music, fireworks and walls of water show the power of creativity and innovation in this spectacular projection. (Darling Harbour)

Trapdoor: Discover what optical illusions are in store if you dare to step onto this fantastical floor mural that tells otherworldly stories of Barangaroo. (Barangaroo South)

Electric Forest: The forest comes to life as never before, from wild hanging fruits to schools of fish, when you enter this strange world of illuminated plants, illusions and a psycho- acoustic soundtrack. (The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney)

Lights for the Wild: Shine a light on the plight of endangered animals with your interactive wristband and gaze in amazement at the beauty of these majestic, giant illuminated lanterns – you can even step into the mouth of PJ the Port Jackson Shark! (Taronga Zoo)

Steampunk Waterworld: Peer into an incredible submerged steampunk water world of lights, sounds and special effects at the Reflection Pool in The Concourse. (Chatswood)

Music 

Curve Ball: Creatives, artists and musicians join forces to deliver this immersive, large scale, live music audio and visual spectacular combining quality dance music and stunning visuals. (3pm-10pm Sunday 11 June, Carriageworks).

Hidden Sydney – The Glittering Mile: The roller coaster ride into the story of Kings Cross and the colourful cast of characters from its gritty, glittery past. (25 May – 18 June, The World Bar, Kings Cross).

Nick Murphy (formerly known as Chet Faker) Presents Missing Link: The charismatic hit-maker returns, premieres new material and resurrecting old favourites in an ambitious in-the-round performance. (1 -3 June, Sydney Opera House).

Dappled Cities: One of the most beloved indie bands to emerge from Sydney over the past two decades presents new album IIIII (pronounced five), complete with immersive lighting spectacle in this one-off concert. (4 June, City Recital Hall)

Ideas

Game-Changer Talks Series: Hear from the creative forces shaping our world and lives, including Buzzfeed founder, CEO and media visionary Jonah Peretti. (28 May, City Recital Hall); influential Academy Award-winning director Oliver Stone (28 May, City Recital Hall) and iconic American artist Shepard Fairey (17 June, Sydney Town Hall). Fairey, the artist behind the Barack Obama HOPE campaign, will also create a public mural in the heart of Sydney’s CBD during the festival, while an exhibition of his music-themed works is on display at Darling Quarter.

The Sunrise Conference: Delve deep into the future of technology, business and innovative start-up ecosystems at this enlightening forum.(31 May)

Semi Permanent: Hear about our innovation future straight from the source in a series of interactive, immersive experiences with world leading innovators from Getty Images, Nike, Uber, Google and more. ( 25-27 May)

Clipped Music Video Festival: Learn from artists and filmmakers at this creative hub as they collaborate and debate and celebrate the art form of music videos. (3 June)

Good Design Festival: Join design luminaries, experience the best in all things design and celebrate the winners of the 2017 Good Design Awards and exhibition. ( 8-11 June)

Rhodes: Creative: Explore tomorrow’s technologies today with hands on activities including 3D printing and robotics. (28 May  – 16 June)

The Vivid Ideas Exchange: You name it, there’s probably a session about it, debating and dissecting everything from fashion to placemaking, storytelling, ageism, marketing, health, innovation, big data and mixed reality. Events at the Vivid Ideas Exchange run every day from 10am to 5pm on Level 6, Museum Contemporary Art Australia throughout Vivid Sydney.

Shows: Sydney, Australia

  1. GV’s various of Circular Quay area – Harbour Bridge, Sydney Opera House Sails, etc.
  2. GV’s various of Royal Botanic Gardens
  3. GV’s various of Kings Cross
  4. GV’s various of Martin Place
  5. GV’s various of Barangaroo South
  6. GV’s various of Chatswood
  7. GV’s various of Taronga Zoo
  8. GV’s various of Darling Harbour
  9. Interview Minister Adam Marshall, NSW Minister for Tourism & Majour Events – English Speech
  10. Interview Sandra Chipchase, Destination NSW CEO & Executive Producer, Vivid Sydney – English Speech
  11. Interview Ignatius Jones, Creative Director, Vivid Sydney – English Speech

-Ends

Other: About Vivid Sydney 

Vivid Sydney is the world’s largest festival of light, music and ideas, which for 23 nights – from Friday 26 May until Saturday 17 June – transforms the Harbour City with its colourful creative canvas. Now in its ninth year, Vivid Sydney is owned, managed and produced by Destination NSW, the NSW Government’s tourism and major events agency. Vivid Sydney features large-scale light installations and projections (Vivid Light); music performances and collaborations (Vivid Music including Vivid LIVE at the Sydney Opera House); and creative ideas, discussion and debate (Vivid Ideas), all celebrating Sydney as the creative hub of the Asia-Pacific. For more information visit www.vividsydney.com

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Final Week Of Sydney’s Summer Cultural Hit, Sydney Festival

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – Sydney’s premiere Summer cultural event, Sydney Festival has entertained thousands of local and visiting audiences over the past fortnight with its huge program of events that celebrate circus, theatre, dance, music, visual arts, opera and more.

Whether swimming in a 60-metre wide ocean of 1.1 million recycled translucent balls at The Beach; inhaling the smell of a city at Scent of Sydney; or seeing a world premiere performance from Sydney Dance Company in Nude Live where dancers respond to more than 100 powerful artworks from the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ major summer Sydney International Art Series exhibition Nude: Art from the Tate collection (with extra dates added due to popular demand), Sydney Festival’s program has an event that suits many ages, interests and cultures.

Now in its last week, Sydney Festival still has more to see and do, including the annual favourite, Australia Day Ferrython; Australian exclusive performances of Greek dance/theatre event, Still Life; and reflective labyrinth, House of Mirrors located right next to the hub of the festival, the Meriton Festival Village.

Sydney Festival 2017 is comprised of 150 events, a staggering 73 of which are free. Genres covered include theatre, circus, dance, music, and opera, among others. The program features 16 world premieres, 9 Australian premieres and 14 Australian exclusives. 454 performances will take place across 46 venues, featuring 1021 artists from 15 countries. Sydney Festival’s audacious contemporary programming positions it at the forefront of arts practice in Australia.

Sydney Festival is supported by the NSW Government through its tourism and major events agency, Destination NSW. Visit www.sydney.com for more information.

Shows: Sydney, Australia

Cut Package showing various Sydney Festival events.

Other: About Destination NSW 

Destination NSW is the lead Government agency for the New South Wales (NSW) tourism and major events sectors. Our role is to market Sydney and NSW as one of the world’s premier tourism and major events destinations; to secure major sporting and cultural events; to work in partnership with Business Events Sydney to win major international conventions and incentive travel reward programs; to develop and deliver initiatives that will drive visitor growth throughout the State; to achieve the NSW Government’s goal of doubling overnight visitor expenditure within the State by the year 2020.

From food and wine festivals to surf competitions, world class sporting events to celebrations of arts and culture, New South Wales has an Annual Calendar of Events that celebrates the diverse facets of

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The Cowboy Who Has Gone From Dodging Bullets To Riding Bucking Bulls

MOUNT ISA, OUTBACK QUEENSLAND – The population of the Queensland mining city of Mount Isa has doubled this weekend for the southern hemisphere’s largest bull riding festival, the Mount Isa Mines Rotary Rodeo.

Riders from Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America have made the journey to Outback Queensland to try and get their hands on a record $230,000 prize money.

Joining them and competing for this title is Haider Alhasnawi, the Iraqi Cowboy who is no stranger to danger.

17 year old Haider knows all it, he moved to Australia from Iraq when he was 10 years old and lived through the war in Iraq as a small boy.

This weekend marked his first rodeo in Mt Isa, competing for a title in Australia’s richest rodeo event.

“Just the atmosphere and the adrenalin rush it’s a good feeling for me these days. For any bull rider it’s a good feeling to be on the back of a bull and just nod your head and go out that shoot, your whole life is in front of you,” says rider Haider Alhasnawi.

When he’s not on the bouncing on the backs of bulls, Haider works as a fencing contractor in the bush.

He can thank some mates who introduced him to rodeo only two years ago , hooking him on the sport.

“Well it’s a big rodeo and it would be good to get a win. Its good to come over here cause there’s a lot of good riders from different places and try to compete against then. If you come first you must be doing pretty well then,” says Haider.

While Haider is still learning the ropes, he’ll rub shoulders with some of the best riders in the world including American PBR member Steve Woolsey, who is making his comeback after an injury prone season after a bull fall on him during a ride.

“For me I’ve won quite a few belt buckles but to come to Australia and to get the chance to win a belt buckle it would be the most sacred I’ve ever won because it’s from Australia.”

Current PBR Australia champion Cody Heffernan made his debut over the weekend in Mount Isa and will be heading to the United States shortly to try his hand on their highly competitive PBR circuit.

“Mount Isa is one of the biggest rodeos in the world,it’s the biggest in the southern hemisphere and I’ve never been here I’ve heard lots about it I’ve always wanted to come here so its about time I got here and I really want to win this title,” says Cody.

The rodeo has been running since 1959, and according to organisers it’s one of the most prized titles to take out in the bull-riding calendar in Australia.

Steve Hilton Arena Director of the Mount Isa Rodeo says, “The buckle represents a lot, the cash it represents the title. If you’re doing something for money it wouldn’t be rodeo there’s good pay here but there’s not a lot of money in it like there is in other sports. It really is the prestige and challenge of being the champion.”

Visitors to the outback city travel as much as 30 hours return trip to watch the spectacle, with Mount Isa some 1800 kilometres from Queensland’s capital city of Brisbane.

The rodeo injects a massive boost into the local economy according to the Honorable Kate Jones MP, Minister for Tourism, Major Events, and has now been granted major event status by the government.

“The whole city comes to life. Everyone feels so welcomed here. This is the biggest event on the Mount Isa social calendar,” says the Minister.

Haider seconds that, his family has been readily accepted into the outback community of Australia, and with his thick Aussie accent, you’d be forgiven for thinking he’d never lived anywhere else.

But his war torn childhood hasn’t been forgotten, and Haider is forever grateful for the safe new life his family now live.

“Coming here and knowing you don’t have to worry about a thing go to work in the morning it’s a good feeling eh?”

Haider didn’t earn any points at the Rodeo this week but after two rides lasting for nearly four seconds feels he has learnt a lot, not just from the rides but from his fellow competitors.

From his life in Iraq to riding bulls at the Mount Isa Mines Rotary Rodeo he feels he can use the adversity of his former life to help him become a competitive bull rider in Australia.

 

Shows:

0:00 Sunrise over Queensland outback.

0:16 Haider riding horse on property at sunrise.

Interview with HaiderAlhasnawi

1:28 You know I just I thought it was a big difference just a whole other level for us. It’s kind of like you are born again you’ve got to learn everything a different language everyone is different here and that. Compare it to back at home its pretty much like a whole new life kind of thing.

1:49 Just that atmosphere and the adrenalin rush and that it’s a good feeling for me these days for any bull rider it’s a good feeling to be on the back of a bull and just nod your head and go out that shoot your whole life is in front of you kind of thing.

2:11 Well it’s a big rodeo and I just wanted to it would be good to get a win at such a big rodeo well known and that then. Its good to come over here cause there’s a lot of good riders from different places and try to compete against then cause if you come first you must be doing pretty well then.

2:35 Coming here and everything’s right you don’t have to worry about a thing go to work in the morning it’s a good feeling eh?

2:46 Haider at the rodeo preparing to ride.

3:02 Haider getting ready to ride bull.

3:18 Haider putting on helmet and mouth guard.

3:27 Haider jumping on bull in shoot.

3:42 Haider leaving shoot on bull and falling off.

4:00 Haider after ride.

4:17 Cody and Haider shaking hands and meeting.

Interview Cody Heffernan Current PBR Australian bull riding champion

4:45 Mount Isa is one of the biggest rodeos in the world the biggest in the southern hemisphere and I’ve never been here I’ve heard lots about it I’ve always wanted to come here and its about time I got here and I really want to win this title.

5:00 Haider leaving the shoot on bull in second ride.

5:15 Aerial view of rodeo festival.

5:28 Horse leaving shoot with rider.

5:37 Crowds watching the rodeo.

5:52 Roping event.

6:16 Girl riding bull and getting stuck, needing the help of clowns.

6:33 Horse riding events at rodeo.

6:50 Rider on bucking horse.

7:00 Rider on horse coming out of the shoot, staying on full 8 seconds and celebrating afterwards.

7:23 Audience watching rodeo action.

7:36 Time lapse of night time falling on rodeo arena.

7:40 Rider leaving shoot on bull.

7:52 Rider leaving shoot on a horse, staying on for a full ride.

8:18 Rider leaving shoot on a horse, staying on for a full ride.

8:31 Rider leaving shoot on a horse and taking a tumble after 7 seconds.

8:44 Competitors calf roping.

8:51 Rider leaving shoot on a bull and falling off and the bull then attacking the clowns.

Interview Steve Hilton Arena Director Mount Isa Rodeo

9:08 Well the buckle represents a lot it represents the cash it represents the title if you’re doing something for money it wouldn’t be rodeo there’s good pay here but there’s not a lot of money in it like there is in other sports it really is the prestige and challenge of being the champion.

Interview Steve Woolsey PBR United States of America

9:24 For me I’ve won quite a few belt buckles but to be able to come to Australia and get the chance to win a belt buckle it would be the most sacred buckle I’ve ever won because its from Australia.

Interview Honorable Kate Jones MP Minister for Tourism, Major Events.

9:44 The whole city comes to life. Everyone feels so welcomed here this is the biggest event on the Mount Isa calendar.

Aug, 14, 2016

0

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The Researcher Who Uses Drones To Capture Whale Sneezes On The Breezes

GOLD COAST, QUEENSLAND – The Humpback Highway is experiencing rush hour in the waters off Queensland’s Gold Coast, as the massive marine mammals make their epic annual migration from Antarctica to the Great Barrier Reef.

In the middle of the incredible spectacle is Griffith University’s Dr Jan-Olaf Meynecke, who spends his days collecting snot samples from whales.

Collecting mucous from a marine mammal weighing more than 30,000 kilograms isn’t a simple process, but with the help of drones it’s now possible.

“We have a small drone and that drone actually has a Petri dish in between its legs. We let that drone fly over the whales to collect the mucous from the whale’s blowhole,” says Dr Meynecke.

Getting the timing right to capture the whale’s mucus in a Petri dish carried by a drone is a big part of the challenge.

Dr Meynecke says “To be able to know when to capture the snot takes a little bit of time. We need to observe the whale, sometimes for almost half an hour because everything needs to be just right.”

Dr Meynecke has embarked upon the unusual research practice to discover the current health of the Humpback Whale population, which has grown from 500 to 20,000 since commercial whaling ended in the 1960’s.

“Basically we get information about the DNA that’s in the whales. When the whale blows out, it blows out the information about who they are. So in other words we can determine if (they are) male or female or other genetic prints that they have.”

The whale loogie’s are taken back to Griffith University’s Smart Water Research Institute on the Gold Coast where it’s hoped the DNA findings will help continue the growth of the Humpback Whale population.

Dr Meynecke’s unusual research and methods are all part of the experience for whale watchers.

“It’s kind of unusual but its pretty amazing what science can do these days.” says Cathy Rowland a visitor from Ireland who spent the day whale watching with Dr Meynecke on board Whales in Paradise, to tick off one of an item on her bucket list

“We saw lots of whales, fins and tails. Something we’ve always wanted to do, so it lived up to our expectations as well.”

The Gold Coast isn’t just a holiday destination for humans, on their 10,000-kilometre migration the Humpbacks themselves have a vacation in the inviting waters, resting and socialising, even giving birth along the stretch of coast during the winter months.

Dr Meynecke and his team of students and researchers not only collect boogers from blow holes, they also observe the whales behaviours to try and unlock their many secrets.

“We’re not just collecting the mucous which in itself is a big mission, we’re also looking at the behaviour of the animals and their migration pattern. We use flukes to identify individuals and we are listening to whales as well, so we capture their sound and try to find out what their current behaviour is,” says Dr Meynecke.

Born in the Netherlands Dr Meynecke is now based on the Gold Coast, a paradise for a marine researcher. If he’s not on the water studying, he’s in it surfing each day.

“There is a big incentive to work here because it is paradise. It’s such a beautiful place in the world, where the water is always clean and blue and there is always such amazing marine wildlife. It’s a dream for a marine biologist.”

SHOTLIST

0:00 Drone footage of whales breaching and coming to surface of the water.

0:57 Tourists on board whale watching boat.

1:15 Whale coming to the surface – view from boat.

1:33 Tourists watching dolphins swim along boat

1:47 Whales coming to the surface – view from boat.

1:57 Tourists taking photos of whales

2:10 Dr Meynecke taking photos.

2:25 Whale coming to the surface – view from boat.

2:35 Dr Meynecke taking photos.

2:44 Whale breaching.

2:50 Releasing drone.

2:55 Drone footage of whales.

3:19 Drone flying past whale as it comes to the surface.

3:30 Footage of drone approaching whale.

3:43 Drone being captured by researchers on boat.

3:56 Dr Meynecke with petri dish onboard boat.

4:12 View of Gold Coast beach and surf.

4:24 Tractor pulling research boat along beach.

4:36 Group of researchers cruising in boat in search of whales.

5:05 Releasing drone.

5:10 Researcher flying drone.

5:22 Drone hovering on water.

5:31 “It’s a small hydrophone to listen to the whale vocalizing.” Upsot from Dr Meynecke.

5:36 Dropping hydrophone in to the water.

5:41 Whale song upsot from hydrophone.

6:10 “That is just amazing guys because so this would be a single male singing, but we’re right above him literally right above him so very unique.” Upsot from Dr Meynecke on board boat reacting to whale song.

6:23 “It’s really cool.” Researcher on boat reacting to whale song.

6:26 Dr Meynecke in laboratory working on samples from petri dishes.

Interview with Dr Meynecke

7:04 Basically we get information about the DNA that’s in the whales so basically when the whale blows out it blows out the information who they are. So in other words we can determine if male or female or other genetic prints that they have.

Interview with Tourists Philip Bredin and Cathy Rowland from Ireland.

7:22 (Cathy) It’s kind of unusual but its pretty amazing what science can do these days not the weirdest thing I’ve ever heard but still pretty unusual.

7:31 (Cathy) We saw lots of whales fins and tales and generally awesome. Something we’ve always wanted to do so lived up to our expectations as well.

Interview with Dr Meynecke

7:48 We have a small drone and that drone actually has a petrie dish in between its legs and we let that drone fly over the whales to collect the mucous the blow from the whales.

8:00 Grab from Dr Meynecke again in German?

8:21 We’re not just collecting the mucous which in itself is a big mission but we’re also looking at the behaviour of the animals their migration pattern we’re looking at individuals who we use flukes to identify individuals and we are listening to whales as well so we capture their sound and try to find out what their current behaviour is.

8:43 There is a big incentive to work here because it is paradise being on such a beautiful place in the world where the water is always clean and blue and there is always such amazing marine wildlife it is a dream for a marine biologist.

9:00 Grab from Dr Meynecke again in German?

9:12 To be able to know when to capture the snot it takes a little bit of time we need to observe the whale for sometimes almost half an hour because everything needs to be right.

Interview with Abbey Korman – Student Researcher from Washington DC.

9:22 I think it makes it easier to understand how important it is and helping out and just being like really on the boat recording data really cool to know that you’re helping.

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Wayne Gretzky Visits Sydney Zoo

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – The greatest ice hockey player of all time, Wayne Gretzky, has taken in the sights of Sydney visiting the city’s Taronga Zoo to get up close with some of New South Wales’ native animals.

Wayne Gretzky is making his first visit to Sydney, secured exclusively by the NSW Government’s tourism and major events agency, Destination NSW. Since touching down in the harbour city, Gretzky has taken to the ice on a custom rink on the harbour foreshore, built specially to welcome him to the state, as well as meeting with Aussie Rules football club, the Sydney Swans, for a ball kicking session.

Gretzky will lace up his skates and take to the ice prior to the USA v Canada match today at Qudos Bank Arena in Sydney, New South Wales to showcase the skills that saw him hold or break an astonishing 60 NHL records throughout an illustrious career spanning 20 years.

Jun, 25, 2016

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