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2019 Mo Ibrahim Foundation Leadership Ceremony, Ibrahim Forum, Concert

Mo Ibrahim Foundation Leadership Ceremony Honors Kofi Annan; Forum looks at Immigration and Youth Unemployment

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation’s annual Governance Weekend honored the past, assessed crucial African challenges, and spread the message of good governance to a young audience, Friday-Sunday 5-7 April.

The weekend began with a tribute to former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. In speeches from Ibrahim, Ivoirian President Alassane Ouattara, UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed, Bono and former Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Annan’s achievements and legacy were honored. The ceremony also featured music from Congolese singer-songwriter Fally Ipupa.

The Leadership Ceremony is at the heart of the 2019 Ibrahim Governance Weekend, the flagship event of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation which takes place in a different African country each year.

Saturday, 6 April, saw the Ibrahim Forum, which this year focused on Immigration and Youth Unemployment, and featured discussion with President Ouattara, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) Vera Songwe, Founder of the Africa 2.0 Foundation and Chairman and CEO of Ubuntu Capital Mamadou Toure, President of the African Development Bank Group (AfDB) Akinwumi Adesina, and President and Chief Executive of Dangote Group, Chairman of Aliko Dangote Foundation Aliko Dangote.

The weekend ends with its annual concert, bringing the Foundation’s focus on good governance to a wider, younger audience through music. This year’s line-up included Ivoirian artists Shado Chris, Safarel Obiang, and Serge Beynaud, legend Youssou NDour as well as Fally Ipupa.

Shows:

Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire (5 April 2019)

1. Wide shots of arrivals, audience and stage

2. Mo Ibrahim, Founder and Chair, Mo Ibrahim Foundation, welcoming attendees, saying “Tonight actually we are celebrating the legacy of a great son of Arica, Kofi Annan of Ghana. We are celebrating. This is not a wake. This is a party. We’re going to have music; were going to have fun because we are rally grateful for having Kofi in our lives, working with us and inspiring us. So we want to celebrate that; so no handkerchiefs.”

3. Bono speaking about Kofi Annan, saying, “If Kofi was a singer, I thought, ‘What would he be?’ He’d be a crooner, wouldn’t he? I knew he loved Nat King Cole. He was certainly more Bing Crosby than Frank Sinatra. I sang with Frank Sinatra, was proud to, but he had a voice like a fist. Kofi, I thought, turned fists into open hands and outstretched arms.”

4. UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed speaking, saying, “Friends, the world today needs more leaders like Kofi Annan. We are living in a period in which we are finding our core values and our multinational foundations under treat. Inequality is certainly on the rise among and especially within countries. Trust in political establishments is on the decline. Intolerance, extremism and virulent nationalisms are increasingly widespread. People are nervous about jobs and about the prospects of their children’s future. Kofi’s example can inspire us as we seek to meet these challenges, especially in our mother Africa.

Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire (6 April 2019)

5. Shots of audience and forum

6. Former Liberian President and Ibrahim Prize Laureate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf speaking about youth unemployment.

7. Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) Vera Songwe speaking about unemployment, saying, “Rwanda has one of the lowest unemployment rates in Africa. Rwanda is the only country in Africa that has signed the free movement of people. So if you’re an IT specialist on the continent today and you want to move to Rwanda, you go to Rwanda. The good news is also that in West Africa, West Africans, 60 percent of the West Africans say they want more migration. We would say, ‘Are they crazy? Everybody says we don’t want migration. Why are they asking for that?’ And I think Mo talked about it as well.”

8. President and Chief Executive of Dangote Group, Chairman of Aliko Dangote Foundation Aliko Dangote in conversation with Mo Ibrahim, speaking about free trade and corruption.

9. Ivoirian President Alassane Ouattara speaking (French), about open borders.

Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire (7 April 2019)

10. Highlights of Serge Beynaud, Youssou NDour and Fally Ipupa performing.

Other: Notes to Editors

Mo Ibrahim Foundation

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent.

The Foundation, which is a non-grant making organisation, focuses on defining, assessing and enhancing governance and leadership in Africa through four main initiatives:

• Ibrahim Index of African Governance

• Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership

• Ibrahim Forum

• Ibrahim Fellowships and Scholarships

Ibrahim Forum

Established in 2010, the Ibrahim Forum is an annual high-level discussion forum tackling issues of critical importance to Africa. The Forum convenes prominent African political and business leaders, representatives from civil society, multilateral and regional institutions as well as Africa’s major international partners to identify specific policy challenges and priorities for action. Data and research on Forum issues are compiled by the Foundation as the basis for informed and constructive debate.

Ibrahim Prize

The Ibrahim Prize celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is awarded to a former Executive Head of State or Government by an independent Prize Committee. Previous Laureates: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (2018, Liberia), Hifikipunye Pohamba (2014, Namibia), Presidents Joaquim Chissano (2007, Mozambique), Festus Mogae (2008, Botswana) and Pedro Pires (2011, Cabo Verde), as well as the 2007 Honorary Ibrahim Laureate – President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

Further contacts:

For more information, please visit: www.moibrahimfoundation.org

You can also follow the Mo Ibrahim Foundation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr:

Twitter: @Mo_IbrahimFdn

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/moibrahimfoundation.org

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/moibrahimfoundation 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/moibrahimfoundation/

ENDS

2018 Mo Ibrahim Foundation Forum And Concert

Rwandan President Kagame and former Ethiopian PM Desalegn address succession of power at the Ibrahim Governance Forum

KIGALI, RWANDA – Fighting corruption can be a dangerous business, according to a new book by former Nigerian finance minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweal. It’s one of the most important issues affecting delivery of public service to the people, which was the focus of the 2018 Ibrahim Forum in Kigali, Rwanda. 

Former Liberian president Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, who received the 2017 Ibrahim Prize for Outstanding Achievement in African Leadership, said that her winning had given hope to girls all over Africa that they can work hard, play by the rules, and can achieve their dreams.   

Hailemariam Desalegn, who recently resigned as prime minister of Ethiopia, said he had done so to accelerate the process of reform in his country. As a new democracy, he said Ethiopia had to make big changes to be able to involve more people in its civic life.    

Rwandan President Paul Kagame said the essential question confronting African governments is why public finance is unable to properly provide public service. Speaking of his own succession, he said that whoever comes after him will have their own challenges and shouldn’t seek “to fill his shoes.” He also spoke about the Rwandan approach to public service, which involves every citizen playing a part in giving back to the nation. 

The Ibrahim Forum, the Leadership Ceremony and a popular music concert are all part of the annual Ibrahim Governance Weekend, the flagship event of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation which takes place in a different African country each year. 

Shows:

  Kigali, Rwanda (28 April 2017)

1. Former Nigerian finance minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweal signing her book, “Fighting Corruption is Dangerous: The Story Behind the Headlines”

2. Ngozi speaking about the danger of fighting corruption, saying: When you have vested interests that have captured an area, a sector, a country – what have you – and they feel threatened because you are trying to make things work properly, then it’s very dangerous because they will take action because you are touching their livelihood. 

3. Former Liberian president and Ibrahim Prize laureate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in the audience of the conference hall

4. Sirleaf speaking about the importance of winning the Ibrahim Price for Outstanding African Leadership, saying: Women, not only in Liberia and Africa, but in the world, know that if you strive to meet your goals, when you succeed, and when you follow what is the law of the land, and you’ve met all the international standards, the world can be yours. And I tell you, as a result of this prize thousands of your girls, thousands of young women, all over Africa, now dream big. 

5. Former Ethiopian prime minister Hailemariam Desalegn walking on to the stage

6. Desalegn speaking about why he left office, saying: I have to set aside my self in order to force these deep reforms. Otherwise the reforms are going very slow and sluggish, which will ultimately yield to a disintegration of my country if we don’t go fast in reforming in a genuine way and in a robust way

7. Audience

8. Desalegn speaking about his future, saying: I hope I can contribute to my country and also to the continent in the years and months to come.

9. Rwandan President Paul Kagame walking on to the stage

10. Kagame speaking about economic management, saying: Leaders across Africa, whether they are presidents or prime ministers—these are important leaders— even others at different levels, the fact that we cannot manage our wealth to deal with our poverty is a defining issue as far as I know it for Africa

11. Audience wide shot

12. Kagame speaking about succession, saying: Everyone has their shoes. I didn’t have to fill anybody’s shoes. I am sure there are people out there who will fill their shoes who will do service to this country differently. They don’t have to fill my shoes. They have to do what they have to do for the country, and starting from where the country is. I started from a different place.   

13. Kagame speaking about public service, saying: It’s about making sure that you mobilize people’s involvement. It’s work to be done. You go to the people. You tell them there are things to do by everyone. Even by those who are going to be served, are going to do something for themselves for connecting with those who are going to serve them. So everybody has responsibility towards this service: those who are expecting it and those who are expecting to deliver it.  

14. Kenya band Sauti Sol sound check

15.Sauti Sol member Delvin Sahara Mudigi speaking about playing at the Mo Ibrahim Foundation concert, saying: Looking at this country, looking at where Africa is, looking at our governance, looking at the kind of leadership that we have and where we want to translate from and to, it’s time that we give importance to this kind of message. So I think being here and for Moto do this is quite amazing for the African people.

Kigali, Rwanda (28 April 2017)

16. Sauti Sol performing  

17. Rwandan band The Ben performing 

18. Nigerian singer Peter P-square speaking about playing at the Mo Ibrahim Foundation concert, saying: We young people – it’s our time to take over. We are going to get there soon. We have a role to play in politics, whether we like it or not. So I think it’s a wonderful initiative and good to have people like us to talk to the people, to gather the people, to deliver our message to them.

19. Peter P-square performing 

Other: Notes to Editors

Mo Ibrahim Foundation

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent.

The Foundation, which is a non-grant making organisation, focuses on defining, assessing and enhancing governance and leadership in Africa through four main initiatives:

• Ibrahim Index of African Governance

• Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership

• Ibrahim Forum

• Ibrahim Fellowships and Scholarships

Ibrahim Forum

Established in 2010, the Ibrahim Forum is an annual high-level discussion forum tackling issues of critical importance to Africa. The Forum convenes prominent African political and business leaders, representatives from civil society, multilateral and regional institutions as well as Africa’s major international partners to identify specific policy challenges and priorities for action. Previous Forums have dealt with: Africa at the Tipping Point (2017), Urbanisation (2015), Africa in the next 50 years (2013), African Youth (2012), African Agriculture (2011) and African Regional Economic Integration (2010). Data and research on Forum issues are compiled by the Foundation as the basis for informed and constructive debate.

Ibrahim Prize

The Ibrahim Prize celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is awarded to a former Executive Head of State or Government by an independent Prize Committee. Previous Laureates: Hifikipunye Pohamba (2014, Namibia), Presidents Joaquim Chissano (2007, Mozambique), Festus Mogae (2008, Botswana) and Pedro Pires (2011, Cabo Verde). The 2007 Honorary Ibrahim Laureate – President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

Contacts:

For more information, please visit: www.moibrahimfoundation.org

You can also follow the Mo Ibrahim Foundation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr:

Twitter: @Mo_IbrahimFdn

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/moibrahimfoundation.org

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/moibrahimfoundation 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/moibrahimfoundation/

ENDS

Former Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf Receives The Ibrahim Award For Outstanding Leadership In Africa

KIGALI, RWANDA – Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the former President of Liberia, last night accepted the 2017 Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership at a special Leadership Ceremony in Kigali, Rwanda.

Speaking to guests from Rwanda and around the world, President Sirleaf said: “As the first woman to receive this awards, it is my hope that women and girls across Africa are inspired to break down barriers, to push back. Where there is a first, there will be a second and a third, and a fourth… My fierce progression towards democratic values, as demonstrated by a successful 2018 transition is reflective of Africa’s quest for democracy. It is a continuum of the continent’s struggle for liberation and freedom. As Nelson Mandela said in March of 1991, ‘I belong to the generation of leaders for whom the achievement of democracy was the defining challenge.’ The trend remains encouraging, as young people empowered by technology demand a right to be heard to be listened to. Africa’s evolution illustrates the strong causal effects between democracy and development.”

The Ibrahim Prize recognises and celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is a US$5 million award paid over 10 years, and US$200,000 annually for life thereafter.

Presenting the Prize to President Sirleaf, Salim Ahmed Salim, Chair of the independent Prize Committee, said: “She courageously embraced opponents and fought for generational change, and paved the way for her successor to follow. Her achievements have inspired and given confidence to millions of women, and may I add, men, in public service.”

Praising President Sirleaf, Alassane Ouattara, President of neighbouring Cote d’Ivoire, said: “Since becoming president, clearly you have succeeded in restoring confidence and hope for the Liberian people and under difficult circumstances. You have undertaken courageous institutional and economic reforms. And thanks to you, Liberia is recognized today, throughout Africa and beyond, for your strong and credible democratic institutions.”

Mo Ibrahim, founder of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, said: “It is wonderful to have a winner this year, and it is also wonderful that the winner is a she. How fitting that President Sirleaf is honoured here in Rwanda, as nobody has done more for women, and the gender issue, than Rwanda.”

Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda, said: “Leadership is both a privilege and a duty. It is best measured in terms of concrete results that citizens can feel in their everyday lives as well as the level of trust that they have in public institutions. During our time in office we must work as hard as we can to do the right things for our people’s future.”

The Leadership Ceremony is at the heart of the 2018 Ibrahim Governance Weekend, the flagship event of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation which takes place in a different African country each year. 

Shows:

1. Exterior views of the Kigali Conference Centre

2. Interiors shots and forum hall

3. Former South African Minister of Finance Trevor Manuel walking with former Nigerian Minister of Finance Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

4. Former President of Cape Verde and 2011 Ibrahim Prize laureate Pedro Pires arriving in hall

5. Former President of Liberia Ellen Johnson Sirleaf arriving in hall with Rwandan President Paul Kagame

6. Dancers and music

7. Wide shot of Kagame on stage

8. Kagame saying: Leadership is both a privilege and a duty. It is best measured in terms of concrete results that citizens can feel in their everyday lives as well as the level of trust that they have in public institutions.

9. Mo Ibrahim, founder of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, saying: Brothers and sisters, it is wonderful to have a winner this year, and it is also wonderful that the winner is a she. How fitting that President Sirleaf is honoured here in Rwanda, as nobody has done more for women, and the gender issue, than Rwanda. Nobody really addressed the gender issue as comprehensively as this country.

10. Cote d’Ivoire President Alassane Outarra on stage

11. Outarra saying: Since becoming president, clearly you have succeeded in restoring confidence and hope for the Liberian people and under difficult circumstances. You have undertaken courageous institutional and economic reforms. And thanks to you, Liberia is recognized today, throughout Africa and beyond, for your strong and credible democratic institutions.  

12. Salim Ahmed Salim, Chair of the independent Prize Committee speaking about President Sirleaf: She courageously embraced opponents and fought for generational change, and paved the way for her successor to follow. Her achievements have inspired and given confidence to millions of women, in public service. and may I add, not only to women but an inspiration to men.

13. Audience applauding

14. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former president of Liberia and Ibrahim 2017 Prize laureate on stage.

15. Sirleaf saying: As the first woman to receive this awards, it is my hope that women and girls across Africa are inspired to break down barriers, to push back. Where there is a first, there will be a second and a third, and a fourth.

16. Sirleaf saying: My fierce progression towards democratic values, as demonstrated by a successful 2018 transition is reflective of Africa’s quest for democracy. It is a continuum of the continent’s struggle for liberation and freedom. As Nelson Mandela said in March of 1991, “I belong to the generation of leaders for whom the achievement of democracy was the defining challenge.” The trend remains encouraging, as young people empowered by technology demand a right to be heard to be listened to. Africa’s evolution illustrates the strong causal effects between democracy and development.

17. Presidents, former presidents and prize committee members gather on stage

18. Liberian singer Phionah Mbabazi supported by her band and dancers from the Nyundo School of Music

19. Liberian band The Ben performingalso supported by a band from the Nyundo School of Music.   

Other: Notes to Editors

Mo Ibrahim Foundation

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent.

The Foundation, which is a non-grant making organisation, focuses on defining, assessing and enhancing governance and leadership in Africa through four main initiatives:

• Ibrahim Index of African Governance

• Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership

• Ibrahim Forum

• Ibrahim Fellowships and Scholarships

Ibrahim Forum

Established in 2010, the Ibrahim Forum is an annual high-level discussion forum tackling issues of critical importance to Africa. The Forum convenes prominent African political and business leaders, representatives from civil society, multilateral and regional institutions as well as Africa’s major international partners to identify specific policy challenges and priorities for action. Previous Forums have dealt with: Africa at the Tipping Point (2017), Urbanisation (2015), Africa in the next 50 years (2013), African Youth (2012), African Agriculture (2011) and African Regional Economic Integration (2010). Data and research on Forum issues are compiled by the Foundation as the basis for informed and constructive debate.

Ibrahim Prize

The Ibrahim Prize celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is awarded to a former Executive Head of State or Government by an independent Prize Committee. Previous Laureates: Hifikipunye Pohamba (2014, Namibia), Presidents Joaquim Chissano (2007, Mozambique), Festus Mogae (2008, Botswana) and Pedro Pires (2011, Cabo Verde). The 2007 Honorary Ibrahim Laureate – President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

 

Media releases, photographs and other detailed resources will be available for all media.

You will be able to watch the Broadcast live on the Foundation’s website.

You can follow the Foundation on Twitter: @Mo_IbrahimFdn

Suggested hashtags to comment #MIFKigali

Contacts:

For more information, please visit: www.moibrahimfoundation.org

You can also follow the Mo Ibrahim Foundation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr:

Twitter: @Mo_IbrahimFdn

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/moibrahimfoundation.org

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/moibrahimfoundation 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/moibrahimfoundation/

ENDS

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The 2017 Mo Ibrahim Foundation Governance Weekend – Day 2

MARRAKECH, MOROCCO – “Africa at the Tipping Point” was the theme of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation’s annual Ibrahim Forum on Saturday, 8 April. While the continent’s future is in the balance as opportunity or failure both loom depending on the policy actions of the private and public sectors and civil society. Most attendees voiced guarded optimism that African nations can overcome the obstacles to progress, especially in the three main areas of discussion: the fight against terrorism, defending democratic institutions, and creating enough jobs for the coming explosive growth in population.

Former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, said that institutions had to be reformed at the highest level, including the UN Security Council and Mo Ibrahim agreed concerning the African Union. Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, noted that African countries are well-represented at the court, which is a good signpost for achieving a fairer society.

Lamido Sanusi, Emir of Kano, Nigeria, warned that local conditions and traditions had to be taken into account – there is no “one-size-fits-all” remedy.

All of these issues don’t just affect Africa. U2 lead singer and founder of ONE and (Red) Bono said that Europe cannot be prosperous without a prosperous Africa.

Member of the Moroccan Royal Cabinet Youssef Amrani called for more regional integration, to share problem-solving and share prosperity. Former Nigerian Finance Minister and World Bank Managing Director Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala said more support for small and medium-sized enterprises, especially those run by women, could be an important engine for job growth.

Engaging the younger generation in everything from political involvement to entrepreneurship seemed to answer questions about how to avoid the negative tipping point across most of the issues. Two Ibrahim scholars are translating their internships and academic experience into action – Aya Chebbi in her own Afrika Youth Movement, and Mariam Yinusa through hr work at UNECA and the AfDB.

Another way of reaching that younger generation with the message of good governance is through football and music. A friendly match between Kawkab Marrakech and TP Mazembe of the DRC ended with the Congolese team taking home the Ibrahim Trophy for the third year in a row with a 1-0 victory.

And at the end of the weekend, thousands of young people attended the closing concert, featuring Youssou NDour, Angelique Kidjo, Hamid al Kasri, Hoba Hoba Spirit, and Hindi Zahra, which lasted late into the night.

Shows: Marrakech, Morocco (8 April 2017)

1. Exterior views of the Palmeraie Conference Centre

2. Interiors shots and forum hall

3. Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan saying, “We can get to a situation where the emerging countries, whether it’s India, Indonesia, South Africa or others will ask, ‘Why do we have to accept decisions by this board, this body, that is not representative. So the permanent members and the big boys have to think through very carefully and decide how much power they want to give up to make the participation of the others meaningful, so that you get cooperation. Otherwise you will get to a situation of destructive competition.

4. Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, saying, “Africa has the largest number of states that have joined the ICC. 34 states are part of the ICC from Africa alone. And this is something that we should be proud of as Africans.”

5. Mo Ibrahim, Founder and Chair of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, saying, “The African Union should really stop acting like an exclusive club of presidents, whose only objective is to protect themselves. Come on, that doesn’t work at this time anymore.”

6. Emir of Kano (Nigeria) Lamido Sanusi, saying, “We should be a little careful about using a diagnosis for every place and very time. And we need greater clarity on specifics and local contexts before we talk about solutions.”

7. Member of the Moroccan Royal Cabinet Youssef Amrani, saying, “I think it is an ongoing process today in Africa. And we should work more on regional integration. I think this is a key issue, you know, in order to solve the conflicts, in order to build up peace, in order to create a space of shared prosperity.”

8. U2 lead singer and founder of ONE and (Red) Bono, saying, “There is a totally different relationship with the continent now. Nobody in Europe doesn’t understand that we are eight miles from the continent of Africa. Europe cannot succeed if Africa fails. Most people know that now.”

9. Founder and CEO, Dangote Group, Aliko Dangote speaking about the need for trust in elections

10. Former Nigerian Finance Minister and World Bank Managing Director Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala speaking about supporting female SME owners

11. Former Ibrahim Scholar and Afrika Youth Movement founder Aya Chebbi speaking about the Afrika Youth Movement.

12. Mariam Yinusa, current Ibrahim fellow, speaking about youth involvement.

13. Moise Katumbi, former governor of Katanga province (DRC) and owner, TP Mazmebe football club, speaking in French about the football match

(9 April 2017)

14. Exterior of stadium

15. Various shots of stadium and crowds

16. Cheihab Falatt of Kawkab Marrakech, saying (French),

17. Robert Kidiaba of TP Mazembe saying (French),

18. Highlights of the football match

19. Concert highlights, including

a. Hindi Zahra

b. Youssou NDour

c. Angelique Kidjo

d. Hamid el Kasri

e. Hoba Hoba Spririt

20. Mo Ibrahim addressing the crowd

 

Other: Notes to Editors

Mo Ibrahim Foundation

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent.

The Foundation, which is a non-grant making organisation, focuses on defining, assessing and enhancing governance and leadership in Africa through four main initiatives:

– Ibrahim Index of African Governance

– Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership

– Ibrahim Forum

– Ibrahim Fellowships and Scholarships

Ibrahim Forum

Established in 2010, the Ibrahim Forum is an annual high-level discussion forum tackling issues of critical importance to Africa. The Forum convenes prominent African political and business leaders, representatives from civil society, multilateral and regional institutions as well as Africa’s major international partners to identify specific policy challenges and priorities for action. Previous Forums have dealt with: Urbanisation (2015), Africa in the next 50 years (2013), African Youth (2012), African Agriculture (2011) and African Regional Economic Integration (2010). Data and research on Forum issues are compiled by the Foundation as the basis for informed and constructive debate.

Ibrahim Prize

The Ibrahim Prize celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is awarded to a former Executive Head of State or Government by an independent Prize Committee. Previous Laureates: Hifikipunye Pohamba (2014, Namibia), Presidents Joaquim Chissano (2007, Mozambique), Festus Mogae (2008, Botswana) and Pedro Pires (2011, Cabo Verde), as well as the 2007 Honorary Ibrahim Laureate – President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

Further contacts: * For more information, please visit: www.moibrahimfoundation.org

* You can also follow the Mo Ibrahim Foundation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr:

Twitter: @Mo_IbrahimFdn

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/moibrahimfoundation.org

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/moibrahimfoundation

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/moibrahimfoundation/

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The 2017 Mo Ibrahim Foundation Governance Weekend – Day 1

MARRAKECH, MOROCCO – The Mo Ibrahim Foundation opened its flagship, high-level Annual Governance Weekend from  7-9 April in Marrakech, Morocco under the High Patronage of His Majesty the King Mohammed VI. The opening night Governance Ceremony.

This year’s event coincides with the Foundation’s celebration of 10 years of putting governance at the centre of Africa’s development discourse. The gathering will build on insights from the 2016 Ibrahim Index of African Governance: A Decade of African Governance and look at the next decade to set out a path forward for the continent. Progressive leaders across politics, business, media and civil society from all over the continent will gather to discuss the challenges of leadership and governance in Africa in the 21st century, and will address the opportunities of the next decade for the African continent.

The weekend will also include the Ibrahim Forum on Saturday, 8 April, focusing on the topic “Africa at the Tipping Point,” and on Sunday a football match between TP Mazembe of DRC and Kawkab Marrackech and a concert with artists Youssou NDour, Angelique Kidjo, Hoba Hoba Spririt, Hindi Zahra and Van.

Further weekend event information:

Saturday, 8 April

Ibrahim Forum (08:00-17:00 GMT)

This year’s Forum topic is “Africa at a Tipping Point.” Panels include former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, U2 lead singer and founder of ONR and (RED) Bono, Unilever CEO Paul Polman and former World Bank Managing Director and Nigerian Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, aming others.

The event live webcast will be available at: mo.ibrahim.foundation/annual-event

Sunday, 9 April

Football match between the Kawkab Marrakech and TP Mazembe (15:00 GMT)

Music concert featuring Youssou NDour, Angelique Kidjo, Hoba Hoba Spririt,Hindi Zahra and Van.  (18:00 GMT)

The football and concert live webcasts will be available at: mifmaroc.org

Shows:

1. Exterior views of the Palmeraie Conference Centre

2. Arrivals including Mary Robinson, Mo Ibrahim and Kofi Annan

3. Wide shot of conference hall

4. Andre Azoulay, representing King Mohammed VI, officially opening the conference, saying:

5. Mo Ibrahim, Founder and Chair, Mo Ibrahim Foundation, speaking about leaders

6. Former German President Horst Koehler, saying:

7. United Nations Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed saying:

8. Musical performance by Hindi Zahra

9. Musical performance by Hugh Masekela

10.Musical performance by Youssou NDour and Angelique Kidjo

 

Other: Notes to Editors

Mo Ibrahim Foundation

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent.

The Foundation, which is a non-grant making organisation, focuses on defining, assessing and enhancing governance and leadership in Africa through four main initiatives:

– Ibrahim Index of African Governance

– Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership

– Ibrahim Forum

– Ibrahim Fellowships and Scholarships

Ibrahim Forum

Established in 2010, the Ibrahim Forum is an annual high-level discussion forum tackling issues of critical importance to Africa. The Forum convenes prominent African political and business leaders, representatives from civil society, multilateral and regional institutions as well as Africa’s major international partners to identify specific policy challenges and priorities for action. Previous Forums have dealt with: Urbanisation (2015), Africa in the next 50 years (2013), African Youth (2012), African Agriculture (2011) and African Regional Economic Integration (2010). Data and research on Forum issues are compiled by the Foundation as the basis for informed and constructive debate.

Ibrahim Prize

The Ibrahim Prize celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is awarded to a former Executive Head of State or Government by an independent Prize Committee. Previous Laureates: Hifikipunye Pohamba (2014, Namibia), Presidents Joaquim Chissano (2007, Mozambique), Festus Mogae (2008, Botswana) and Pedro Pires (2011, Cabo Verde), as well as the 2007 Honorary Ibrahim Laureate – President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

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10th Release Of Ibrahim Index Of African Governance

LONDON, UK – Progress in African governance over the last decade is significant but held back by deterioration in Safety and Rule of Law

The 2016 Ibrahim Index of African Governance (IIAG), the 10th release by the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, reveals overall improvement in governance over the past ten years, with some deterioration in one category: Safety and Rule of Law. 37 countries, which are home to 70% of African citizens, registered progress across Human Development, Participation and Human Rights and Sustainable Economic Opportunity.

Story: The tenth edition of the IIAG, the most comprehensive analysis of African governance undertaken to date, brings together a decade of data to assess each of Africa’s 54 countries against 95 indicators drawn from 34 independent sources. This year, for the first time, the IIAG includes Public Attitude Survey data from Afrobarometer. This captures Africans’ own perceptions of governance, which provide fresh perspective on the results registered by other data such expert assessment and official data. In fact, according to Mo Ibrahim Foundation Founder and Chair Mo Ibrahim, the disparity shows that citizens are raising their expectations, a feeling echoed by former UN Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos.

Over the last decade, overall governance has improved by one score point at the continental average level, with 37 countries – home to 70% of African citizens – registering progress. This overall positive trend has been led mainly by improvement in Human Development and Participation & Human Rights. Sustainable Economic Opportunity also registered an improvement, but at a slower pace. However, these positive trends stand in contrast to a pronounced and concerning drop in Safety & Rule of Law, for which 33 out of the 54 African countries – home to almost two-thirds of the continent’s population – have experienced a decline since 2006, 15 of them quite substantially.

This worrying trend has worsened recently, with almost half of the countries on the continent recording their worst score ever in this category within the last three years. This is driven by large deteriorations in the subcategories of Personal Safety and National Security. Notably, Accountability is now the lowest scoring subcategory of the whole Index. Without exception, all countries that have deteriorated at the Overall Governance level have also deteriorated in Safety & Rule of Law.

38 countries – together accounting for 73% of continental GDP – have recorded an improvement over the last decade. The largest progress has been achieved in the sub-category Infrastructure, driven by a massive improvement in the indicator Digital & IT Infrastructure, the most improved of all 95 indicators. However, the average score for Infrastructure still remains low, with the indicator Electricity Infrastructure registering a particularly worrying decline in 19 countries, home to 40% of Africa’s population.

Shows:

1. Graphics about the Ibrahim Index

2. Shots of dais and audience

3. Mo Ibrahim Foundation Founder and Chair Mo Ibrahim speaking about the Ibrahim Index of African Governance, saying: We see an improvement. It’s not a fantastic improvement, but it is an improvement. So: good news, but not fantastic news. We also notice that actually it’s 2000 to 2005 and 2006, there was the greatest improvement in governance, actually. There was real improvement there. But after that it started to slow down. And for two or three years now we have been raising the issue about this stagnation. Somehow people got a little bit too comfortable. And I think we really need to continue the work. It is challenging. That is an improvement, it’s not a fantastic improvement; it’s not enough.

4. Ibrahim saying: It’s the job of the government to deliver public goods to the population, and as such it is measurable – you can measure this. We want to move the narrative from, “I like this president because he speaks well, or he sings well or he dances well,” to: “What actually has he delivered over the year? What actually did he deliver to his people? That will be the way we evaluate our government and the way we wish the conversation between civil society, governments, business, all stakeholders, to be – around facts, about data.

5. Ibrahim saying: It is really interesting. While in this case data proves there is actually improvement in health and education, actually the African people’s perception is different. And that raises the question: Is that because people’s

expectations are getting higher now, so they are not really satisfied with what is being given? Is it social media now giving people that view of what is available, of what really happens, what guys are getting in other continents compared to what we are doing here? It is something we really need to understand and really look in to a little bit more.

6. Former Botswana President and winner of the Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership Festus Mogae, saying: The Index perhaps is the one thing that can help, since we all read it, as leaders, and think of it in our own privacy, and see where we have been placed. I think that’s perhaps the most effective weapon against corruption and fraud. And as far as citizens are concerned, governments that want to fight corruption – they can do so.

7. Ngaire Woods, Dean, Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, saying: Ten years ago, people would talk about “the Africa premium”, or “the Africa Penalty” – the penalty that African countries across the continent paid because they had poor governance. And what the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, and the Ibrahim Index have done is given us real information, year on year, about what governance in each of the 54 countries of the continent looks like. And that’s shown people, first, that governance in many countries is good and improving, that there isn’t an Africa-wide story. It’s enabled people to think very carefully and use this dashboard to make nuanced decisions. And second, it has shown the importance that real information can keep you ahead of the curve.

8. Jendayi Frazer, President and CEO of 50 Ventures, LLC; former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs, saying: If you look at it as a balance, and look at all four major indicators, there is reason to be optimistic. Governance has actually gone up. Not as fast as it should because I think personal security and national security – Personal Safety and National Security indicators are dragging it down. But definitely if we can have interventions that are smart and that help society itself address its problems towards sustainable peace, then I am very optimistic.

9. Donald Kaberuka, former President of the African Development Bank and Chair of the Board of Directors, saying: Economics may be doing very well, but attention must focus on distribution and inclusion is vital. Now, the fact that rural economies are improving is good, gender attention is good, but the education quality issue worries me enormously. And I hope policy-makers look at the demographic dynamics: So, child mortality is down; attendance in school is up; but education outcomes are falling. That suggest to me that it could be a problem in the next 20 years, when the famous “demographic dividend” shows up.

10. Abdoulie Janneh, Executive Director, Liaison with Governments and Institutions in Africa for the Mo Ibrahim Foundation; former UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Africa, (UNECA), saying: Mechanisms have been put in place to minimize. Look, there is no country where there is no corruption, but the question is, let’s do our best to minimize it, to make sure there is no impunity when people are corrupt and held accountable. I think that’s the general trend in Africa. The awareness is here, the willingness, and the determination to say, “Let us do something about it.” I think I feel that in the continent.

11. Abdalla Hamdok, Chair of the Ibrahim Index of African Governance Advisory Committee; Deputy Executive Secretary, Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), saying: Any serious government in the continent today won’t wait to see itself in the Index. Is it going up? Is it going down? So the Index is essentially addressing the fact of the assessment that: If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.” And this is why the Index is here to stay.

12. Valerie Amos, Director of SOAS; former UN Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, saying: There are some really positive things that have come out of the Index this year. Looking at it over a 10-year trajectory, I was particularly struck by the Human Development indicators. If you look at education, if you look at health, if you look at welfare, there has been a sustained increase in all of those indicators on the continent. Now, that doesn’t necessarily match with people’s perceptions of where things are. But I think the fact that the data is telling us that things are improving, against the backdrop of where people’s expectations are rising, I think that could only be a good thing.

13. Mohamed ElBaradei, former Director-General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Ibrahim Prize committee member, speaking in Arabic: You cannot separate the Rule of Law from the overall indicators. What we are trying to do is measure all the indicators in Africa. How we can measure how the people in Africa can catch up with the rest of the world and become free and prosperous. And what we see right now is that Personal Safety, Rule of Law is not as it should be in fact it is deteriorating, but I have to look at “Why this is happening? Is it because political participation is not as good as it should be? Human rights are not in good shape?” People feel unemployment, corruption. When you have that, we have a tendency to say that we people can’t identify with government and we will take the government into our own hands.

 

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